Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

NASA's Aquarius Sees Salty Shifts

28.02.2013
The colorful images chronicle the seasonal stirrings of our salty world: Pulses of freshwater gush from the Amazon River’s mouth; an invisible seam divides the salty Arabian Sea from the fresher waters of the Bay of Bengal; a large patch of freshwater appears in the eastern tropical Pacific in the winter. These and other changes in ocean salinity patterns are revealed by the first full year of surface salinity data captured by NASA’s Aquarius instrument.

“With a bit more than a year of data, we are seeing some surprising patterns, especially in the tropics,” said Aquarius Principal Investigator Gary Lagerloef, of Earth & Space Research in Seattle. “We see features evolve rapidly over time.”

Launched June 10, 2011, aboard the Argentine spacecraft Aquarius/Satélite de Aplicaciones Científicas (SAC)-D, Aquarius is NASA’s first satellite instrument specifically built to study the salt content of ocean surface waters. Salinity variations, one of the main drivers of ocean circulation, are closely connected with the cycling of freshwater around the planet and provide scientists with valuable information on how the changing global climate is altering global rainfall patterns.

The salinity sensor detects the microwave emissivity of the top 1 to 2 centimeters (about an inch) of ocean water – a physical property that varies depending on temperature and saltiness. The instrument collects data in 386 kilometer-wide (240-mile) swaths in an orbit designed to obtain a complete survey of global salinity of ice-free oceans every seven days.

The Changing Ocean

The animated version of Aquarius’ first year of data unveils a world of varying salinity patterns. The Arabian Sea, nestled up against the dry Middle East, appears much saltier than the neighboring Bay of Bengal, which gets showered by intense monsoon rains and receives freshwater discharges from the Ganges and other large rivers. Another mighty river, the Amazon, releases a large freshwater plume that heads east toward Africa or bends up north to the Caribbean, depending on the prevailing seasonal currents. Pools of freshwater carried by ocean currents from the central Pacific Ocean’s regions of heavy rainfall pile up next to Panama’s coast, while the Mediterranean Sea sticks out in the Aquarius maps as a very salty sea.

One of the features that stand out most clearly is a large patch of highly saline water across the North Atlantic. This area, the saltiest anywhere in the open ocean, is analogous to deserts on land, where little rainfall and a lot of evaporation occur. A NASA-funded expedition, the Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study (SPURS), traveled to the North Atlantic’s saltiest spot last fall to analyze the causes behind this high salt concentration and to validate Aquarius measurements.

“My conclusion after five weeks out at sea and analyzing five weekly maps of salinity from Aquarius while we were there was that indeed, the patterns of salinity variation seen from Aquarius and by the ship were similar,” said Eric Lindstrom, NASA’s physical oceanography program scientist, of NASA Headquarters, Washington, and a participant of the SPURS research cruise.

Future goals

“The Aquarius prime mission is scheduled to run for three years but there is no reason to think that the instrument could not be able to provide valuable data for much longer than that,” said Gene Carl Feldman, Aquarius project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. “The instrument has been performing flawlessly and our colleagues in Argentina are doing a fantastic job running the spacecraft, providing us a nice, stable ride.”

In future years, one of the main goals of the Aquarius team is to figure out ways to fine-tune the readings and retrieve data closer to the coasts and the poles. Land and ice emit very bright microwave emissions that swamp the signal read by the satellite. At the poles, there’s the added complication that cold polar waters require very large changes in their salt concentration to modify their microwave signal.

Still, the Aquarius team was surprised by how close to the coast the instrument is already able to collect salinity measurements.

“The fact that we’re getting areas, particularly around islands in the Pacific, that are not obviously badly contaminated is pretty remarkable. It says that our ability to screen out land contamination seems to be working quite well,” Feldman said.

Another factor that affects salinity readings is intense rainfall. Heavy rain can affect salinity readings by attenuating the microwave signal Aquarius reads off the ocean surface as it travels through the soaked atmosphere. Rainfall can also create roughness and shallow pools of fresh water on the ocean surface. In the future, the Aquarius team wants to use another instrument aboard Aquarius/SAC-D, the Argentine-built Microwave Radiometer, to gauge the presence of intense rain simultaneously to salinity readings, so that scientists can flag data collected during heavy rainfall.

An ultimate goal is combining the Aquarius measurements to those of its European counterpart, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite (SMOS) to produce more accurate and finer maps of ocean salinity. In addition, the Aquarius team, in collaboration with researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is about to release its first global soil moisture dataset, which will complement SMOS’ soil moisture measurements.

“The first year of the Aquarius mission has mostly been about understanding how the instruments and algorithms are performing,” Feldman said. “Now that we have overcome the major hurdles, we can really begin to focus on understanding what the data are telling us about how the ocean works, how it affects weather and climate, and what new insights we can gain by having these remarkable salinity measurements.”

Aquarius was built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Goddard. JPL managed Aquarius through its commissioning phase and is archiving mission data. Goddard now manages Aquarius mission operations and processes science data. Argentina's space agency, Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales (CONAE), provided the SAC-D spacecraft, optical camera, thermal camera with Canada, microwave radiometer, sensors from various Argentine institutions and the mission operations center. France and Italy also contributed instruments.

Maria-Jose Vinas
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
Earth Science News Team

Maria-Jose Vinas | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nasa.gov
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/aquarius/news/data-first-year.html

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht 'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field
23.02.2017 | Tokyo Institute of Technology

nachricht NASA spies Tropical Cyclone 08P's formation
23.02.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Kühler Zwerg und die sieben Planeten

Erdgroße Planeten mit gemäßigtem Klima in System mit ungewöhnlich vielen Planeten entdeckt

In einer Entfernung von nur 40 Lichtjahren haben Astronomen ein System aus sieben erdgroßen Planeten entdeckt. Alle Planeten wurden unter Verwendung von boden-...

Im Focus: Mehr Sicherheit für Flugzeuge

Zwei Entwicklungen am Lehrgebiet Rechnerarchitektur der FernUniversität in Hagen können das Fliegen sicherer machen: ein Flugassistenzsystem, das bei einem totalen Triebwerksausfall zum Einsatz kommt, um den Piloten ein sicheres Gleiten zu einem Notlandeplatz zu ermöglichen, und ein Assistenzsystem für Segelflieger, das ihnen das Erreichen größerer Höhen erleichtert. Präsentiert werden sie von Prof. Dr.-Ing. Wolfram Schiffmann auf der Internationalen Fachmesse für Allgemeine Luftfahrt AERO vom 5. bis 8. April in Friedrichshafen.

Zwei Entwicklungen am Lehrgebiet Rechnerarchitektur der FernUniversität in Hagen können das Fliegen sicherer machen: ein Flugassistenzsystem, das bei einem...

Im Focus: HIGH-TOOL unterstützt Verkehrsplanung in Europa

Forschung am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) unterstützt die Europäische Kommission bei der Verkehrsplanung: Anhand des neuen Modells HIGH-TOOL lässt sich bewerten, wie verkehrspolitische Maßnahmen langfristig auf Wirtschaft, Gesellschaft und Umwelt wirken. HIGH-TOOL ist ein frei zugängliches Modell mit Modulen für Demografie, Wirtschaft und Ressourcen, Fahrzeugbestand, Nachfrage im Personen- und Güterverkehr sowie Umwelt und Sicherheit. An dem nun erfolgreich abgeschlossenen EU-Projekt unter der Koordination des KIT waren acht Partner aus fünf Ländern beteiligt.

Forschung am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) unterstützt die Europäische Kommission bei der Verkehrsplanung: Anhand des neuen Modells HIGH-TOOL lässt...

Im Focus: Zinn in der Photodiode: nächster Schritt zur optischen On-Chip-Datenübertragung

Schon lange suchen Wissenschaftler nach einer geeigneten Lösung, um optische Komponenten auf einem Computerchip zu integrieren. Doch Silizium und Germanium allein – die stoffliche Basis der Chip-Produktion – sind als Lichtquelle kaum geeignet. Jülicher Physiker haben nun gemeinsam mit internationalen Partnern eine Diode vorgestellt, die neben Silizium und Germanium zusätzlich Zinn enthält, um die optischen Eigenschaften zu verbessern. Das Besondere daran: Da alle Elemente der vierten Hauptgruppe angehören, sind sie mit der bestehenden Silizium-Technologie voll kompatibel.

Schon lange suchen Wissenschaftler nach einer geeigneten Lösung, um optische Komponenten auf einem Computerchip zu integrieren. Doch Silizium und Germanium...

Im Focus: Innovative Antikörper für die Tumortherapie

Immuntherapie mit Antikörpern stellt heute für viele Krebspatienten einen Erfolg versprechenden Ansatz dar. Weil aber längst nicht alle Patienten nachhaltig von diesen teuren Medikamenten profitieren, wird intensiv an deren Verbesserung gearbeitet. Forschern um Prof. Thomas Valerius an der Christian Albrechts Universität Kiel gelang es nun, innovative Antikörper mit verbesserter Wirkung zu entwickeln.

Immuntherapie mit Antikörpern stellt heute für viele Krebspatienten einen Erfolg versprechenden Ansatz dar. Weil aber längst nicht alle Patienten nachhaltig...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Big Data Centrum Ostbayern-Südböhmen startet Veranstaltungsreihe

23.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

DFG unterstützt Kongresse und Tagungen - April 2017

23.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Wie werden wir gesund alt? - Alternsforscher tagen auf interdisziplinärem Symposium in Magdeburg

23.02.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Heinz Maier-Leibnitz-Preise 2017: DFG und BMBF zeichnen vier Forscherinnen und sechs Forscher aus

23.02.2017 | Förderungen Preise

Big Data Centrum Ostbayern-Südböhmen startet Veranstaltungsreihe

23.02.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Planeten außerhalb unseres Sonnensystems: Bayreuther Forscher dringen tief ins Weltall vor

23.02.2017 | Physik Astronomie