Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

A new Harvard report probes security risks of extreme weather and climate change

12.02.2013
Scientists identify security risks from climate change, and recommend investments in monitoring and forecasting to prepare for growing threats

Increasingly frequent extreme weather events such as droughts, floods, severe storms, and heat waves have focused the attention of climate scientists on the connections between greenhouse warming and extreme weather. Because of the potential threat to U.S. national security, a new study was conducted to explore the forces driving extreme weather events and their impacts over the next decade, specifically with regard to their implications for national security planning.

The report finds that the early ramifications of climate extremes resulting from climate change are already upon us and will continue to be felt over the next decade, directly impacting U.S. national security interests. "Lessons from the past are no longer of great value as a guide to the future," said co-lead author Michael McElroy, Gilbert Butler Professor of Environmental Studies at Harvard University. "Unexpected changes in regional weather are likely to define the new climate normal, and we are not prepared."

Changes in extremes include more record high temperatures; fewer but stronger tropical cyclones; wider areas of drought and increases in precipitation; increased climate variability; Arctic warming and attendant impacts; and continued sea level rise as greenhouse warming continues and even accelerates. These changes will affect water and food availability, energy decisions, the design of critical infrastructure, use of the global commons such as the oceans and the Arctic region, and critical ecosystem resources. They will affect both underdeveloped and industrialized countries with large costs in terms of economic and human security. The study identifies specific regional climate impacts—droughts and desertification in Mexico, Southwest Asia, and the Eastern Mediterranean, and increased flooding in South Asia—that are of particular strategic importance to the United States.

The report concludes that the risks related to extreme weather require that the U.S. sustain and augment its scientific and technical capacity to observe key indicators, monitor unfolding events, and forewarn of impending security threats as nations adapt to a changing climate. The study recommends a national strategy for strategic observations and monitoring— including greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions, ocean temperatures, and satellite observations of the Arctic—and improved forecast models. "Our critical observational infrastructure is at risk from declining funding," added co-lead author D. James Baker, Director of the Global Carbon Measurement Program at the William J. Clinton Foundation and former Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). "Without that knowledge, the needs of civil society and national security for mitigation and adaptation will go unmet."

The report grew out of a series of workshops with an international group of leading climate scientists held at the National Academy of Sciences, Columbia University, and the Harvard University Center for the Environment. The study was conducted with funds provided by the Central Intelligence Agency. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the CIA or the U.S. Government.

Michael McElroy is the Gilbert Butler Professor of Environmental Studies at Harvard University with a joint appointment in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He is a faculty associate of the Harvard University Center for the Environment. He studies changes in the composition of the atmosphere with an emphasis on the impact of human activity. His research includes investigations of processes affecting the abundance of ozone in the stratosphere and factors influencing the chemical composition of the troposphere. It explores the manner in which changes in the composition of the atmosphere affect climate. His research also addresses challenges for public policy posed by the rapid pace of industrialization in developing countries such as China and India while exploring alternative strategies for more sustainable development in mature economies such as the United States. Email: mbm@seas.harvard.edu; Telephone: 617-495-4359

D. James Baker, is Director, Global Carbon Measurement Program at the William J. Clinton Foundation, working with forestry programs in developing countries to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and alleviate poverty. He served as Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the Clinton administration. He is also a a member of the U.S. Commission on Climate and Tropical Forests and of the Technical Advisory Panel for the World Bank's Forest Carbon Partnership Facility. He is a Visiting Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and is an adjunct professor at the University of Pennsylvania and at the University of Delaware. He has more than 100 scientific publications and is the author of the book Planet Earth: The View from Space, published by Harvard University Press. Email: djamesbaker@comcast.net; Telephone: 215-939-2021

Download the full "Climate Extremes: Recent Trends with Implications for National Security" report at www.environment.harvard.edu/climate-extremes

Michael McElroy | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.harvard.edu
http://www.environment.harvard.edu/climate-extremes

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht NASA sees development of Tropical Storm 11P in Southwestern Pacific
11.02.2016 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht Southwest sliding into a drier climate
11.02.2016 | National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Messkampagne POLSTRACC: Starker Ozonabbau über der Arktis möglich

Die arktische Stratosphäre war in diesem Winter bisher außergewöhnlich kalt, damit sind alle Voraussetzungen für das Auftreten eines starken Ozonabbaus in den nächsten Wochen gegeben. Diesen Schluss legen erste Ergebnisse der vom Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) koordinierten Messkampagne POLSTRACC nahe, die seit Ende 2015 in der Arktis läuft. Eine wesentliche Rolle spielen dabei vertikal ausgedehnte polare Stratosphärenwolken, die zuletzt weite Bereiche der Arktis bedeckten: An ihrer Oberfläche finden chemische Reaktionen statt, welche den Ozonabbau beschleunigen. Diese Wolken haben die Klimaforscher nun ungewöhnlicherweise bis in den untersten Bereich der Stratosphäre beobachtet.

„Weite Bereiche der Arktis waren über einen Zeitraum von mehreren Wochen von polaren Stratosphärenwolken zwischen etwa 14 und 26 Kilometern Höhe bedeckt –...

Im Focus: AIDS-Impfstoffproduktion in Algen

Pflanzen und Mikroorganismen werden vielfältig zur Medikamentenproduktion genutzt. Die Produktion solcher Biopharmazeutika in Pflanzen nennt man auch „Molecular Pharming“. Sie ist ein stetig wachsendes Feld der Pflanzenbiotechnologie. Hauptorganismen sind vor allem Hefe und Nutzpflanzen, wie Mais und Kartoffel – Pflanzen mit einem hohen Pflege- und Platzbedarf. Forscher um Prof. Ralph Bock am Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie in Potsdam wollen mit Hilfe von Algen ein ressourcenschonenderes System für die Herstellung von Medikamenten und Impfstoffen verfügbar machen. Die Praxistauglichkeit untersuchten sie an einem potentiellen AIDS-Impfstoff.

Die Produktion von Arzneimitteln in Pflanzen und Mikroorganismen ist nicht neu. Bereits 1982 gelang es, durch den Einsatz gentechnischer Methoden, Bakterien so...

Im Focus: Einzeller mit Durchblick: Wie Bakterien „sehen“

Ein 300 Jahre altes Rätsel der Biologie ist geknackt. Wie eine internationale Forschergruppe aus Deutschland, Großbritannien und Portugal herausgefunden hat, nutzen Cyanobakterien – weltweit vorkommende mikroskopisch kleine Einzeller – das Funktionsprinzip des Linsenauges, um Licht wahrzunehmen und sich darauf zuzubewegen. Der Schlüssel zu des Rätsels Lösung war eine Idee aus Karlsruhe: Jan Gerrit Korvink, Professor am KIT und Leiter des Instituts für Mikrostrukturtechnik (IMT) am KIT, nutzte Siliziumplatten und UV-Licht, um den Brechungsindex der Einzeller zu messen.

 

Im Focus: Production of an AIDS vaccine in algae

Today, plants and microorganisms are heavily used for the production of medicinal products. The production of biopharmaceuticals in plants, also referred to as “Molecular Pharming”, represents a continuously growing field of plant biotechnology. Preferred host organisms include yeast and crop plants, such as maize and potato – plants with high demands. With the help of a special algal strain, the research team of Prof. Ralph Bock at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology in Potsdam strives to develop a more efficient and resource-saving system for the production of medicines and vaccines. They tested its practicality by synthesizing a component of a potential AIDS vaccine.

The use of plants and microorganisms to produce pharmaceuticals is nothing new. In 1982, bacteria were genetically modified to produce human insulin, a drug...

Im Focus: Weltweit genaueste optische Einzelionen-Uhr

Als erste Forschergruppe weltweit haben Atomuhren-Spezialisten der Physikalisch-Technischen Bundesanstalt (PTB) jetzt eine optische Einzelionen-Uhr gebaut, die eine bisher nur theoretisch vorhergesagte Genauigkeit erreicht. Ihre optische Ytterbium-Uhr erreichte eine relative systematische Messunsicherheit von 3 E-18. Die Ergebnisse sind in der aktuellen Ausgabe der Fachzeitschrift Physical Review Letters veröffentlicht.

Als erste Forschergruppe weltweit haben Atomuhren-Spezialisten der Physikalisch-Technischen Bundesanstalt (PTB) jetzt eine optische Einzelionen-Uhr gebaut, die...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Frauen in der digitalen Arbeitswelt: Gestaltung für die IT-Branche und das Ingenieurswesen

11.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verhaltensmedizin und Verhaltensmodifikation tagt in Mainz

10.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Bericht zur weltweiten Lage der Bestäuber

10.02.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Messkampagne POLSTRACC: Starker Ozonabbau über der Arktis möglich

11.02.2016 | Geowissenschaften

Siliziumchip mit integriertem Laser: Licht aus dem Nanodraht

11.02.2016 | Physik Astronomie

Große Sauerstoffquellen im Erdinneren: Neue Erkenntnisse der Hochdruck- und Hochtemperaturforschung

11.02.2016 | Geowissenschaften