Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Technion Breakthrough: A New Chapter of Solar Energy Conversion and Storage?

13.11.2012
Using the power of the sun and ultrathin films of iron oxide (commonly known as rust), Technion-Israel Institute of Technology researchers have found a novel way to split water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen.

The breakthrough, published this week in Nature Materials, could lead to less expensive, more efficient ways to store solar energy in the form of hydrogen-based fuels. This could be a major step forward in the development of viable replacements for fossil fuels.

“Our approach is the first of its kind,” says lead researcher Associate Prof. Avner Rothschild, of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. “We have found a way to trap light in ultrathin films of iron oxide that are 5,000 times thinner than typical office paper. This is the enabling key to achieving high efficiency and low cost. ”

Iron oxide is a common semiconductor material, inexpensive to produce, stable in water, and – unlike other semiconductors such as silicon – can oxidize water without itself being oxidated, corroded, or decomposed. But it also presents challenges, the greatest of which was finding a way to overcome its poor electrical transport properties. Researchers have struggled for years with the tradeoff between light absorption and the separation and collection of photogenerated charge carriers before they die out by recombination.

“Our light-trapping scheme overcomes this tradeoff, enabling efficient absorption in ultrathin films wherein the photogenerated charge carriers are collected efficiently,” says Prof. Rothschild. “The light is trapped in quarter-wave or even deeper sub-wavelength films on mirror-like back reflector substrates. Interference between forward- and backward-propagating waves enhances the light absorption close to the surface, and the photogenerated charge carriers are collected before they die off."

The breakthrough could make possible the design of inexpensive solar cells that combine ultrathin iron oxide photoelectrodes with conventional photovoltaic cells based on silicon or other materials to produce electricity and hydrogen. According to Prof. Rothschild, these cells could store solar energy for on demand use, 24 hours per day. This is in strong contrast to conventional photovoltaic cells, which provide power only when the sun is shining (and not at night or when it is cloudy).

The findings could also be used to reduce the amount of extremely rare elements that the solar panel industry uses to create the semiconductor material in their second-generation photovoltaic cells. The Technion team’s light trapping method could save 90% or more of rare elements like Tellurium and Indium, with no compromise in performance.

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is a major source of the innovation and brainpower that drives the Israeli economy, and a key to Israel’s renown as the world’s “Start-Up Nation.” Its three Nobel Prize winners exemplify academic excellence. Technion people, ideas and inventions make immeasurable contributions to the world including life-saving medicine, sustainable energy, computer science, water conservation and nanotechnology.

American Technion Society (ATS) donors provide critical support for the Technion—more than $1.74 billion since its inception in 1940. Based in New York City, the ATS and its network of chapters across the U.S. provide funds for scholarships, fellowships, faculty recruitment and chairs, research, buildings, laboratories, classrooms and dormitories, and more.

Kevin Hattori | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.ats.org

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Did you know that UV light helps to ensure safe bathing during the summer months?
25.07.2016 | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

nachricht Making magnets flip like cats at room temperature
21.07.2016 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Superschneller Internetfunk dank Terahertz-Strahlung

Wissenschaftler aus Dresden und Dublin haben einen vielversprechenden technologischen Ansatz gefunden, der Notebooks und anderen mobilen Computern in Zukunft deutlich schnellere Internet-Funkzugänge ermöglichen könnte als bisher. Die Teams am Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) und am irischen Trinity College Dublin brachten hauchdünne Schichten aus einer speziellen Verbindung von Mangan und Gallium dazu, sehr effizient Strahlung im sogenannten Terahertz-Frequenzbereich auszusenden. Als Sender in WLAN-Funknetzen eingesetzt, könnten die höheren Frequenzen die Datenraten zukünftiger Kommunikations-Netzwerke spürbar erhöhen.

„Wir halten diesen Ansatz für technologisch sehr interessant“, betont Dr. Michael Gensch, Leiter einer Arbeitsgruppe am HZDR, die sich mit den...

Im Focus: Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

While studying purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, researchers discovered an unconventional charge density wave on its surface.

Im Focus: Forschen in 15 Kilometern Höhe - Einsatz des Flugzeuges HALO wird weiter gefördert

Das moderne Höhen-Forschungsflugzeug HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) wird auch in Zukunft für Projekte zur Atmosphären- und Erdsystemforschung eingesetzt werden können: Die Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) bewilligte jetzt Fördergelder von mehr als 11 Millionen Euro für die nächste Phase des HALO Schwerpunktprogramms (SPP 1294) in den kommenden drei Jahren. Die Universität Leipzig ist neben der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und der Technischen Universität Dresden federführend bei diesem DFG-Schwerpunktprogramm.

Die Universität Leipzig wird von der Fördersumme knapp 6 Millionen Euro zur Durchführung von zwei Forschungsprojekten mit HALO sowie zur Deckung der hohen...

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Rekord in der Hochdruckforschung: 1 Terapascal erstmals erreicht und überschritten

Einem internationalen Forschungsteam um Prof. Dr. Natalia Dubrovinskaia und Prof. Dr. Leonid Dubrovinsky von der Universität Bayreuth ist es erstmals gelungen, im Labor einen Druck von 1 Terapascal (= 1.000.000.000.000 Pascal) zu erzeugen. Dieser Druck ist dreimal höher als der Druck, der im Zentrum der Erde herrscht. Die in 'Science Advances' veröffentlichte Studie eröffnet neue Forschungsmöglichkeiten für die Physik und Chemie der Festkörper, die Materialwissenschaft, die Geophysik und die Astrophysik.

Extreme Drücke und Temperaturen, die im Labor mit hoher Präzision erzeugt und kontrolliert werden, sind ideale Voraussetzungen für die Physik, Chemie und...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Kongress für Molekulare Medizin: Krankheiten interdisziplinär verstehen und behandeln

20.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Ultraschnelle Kalorimetrie: Gesellschaft für thermische Analyse GEFTA lädt zur Jahrestagung

19.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Das neue Präventionsgesetz aktiv gestalten

19.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Ökohaus-Pionier bei seinen Kunden äußerst beliebt

25.07.2016 | Unternehmensmeldung

Wasserdicht dank Bakterienfilm: Neuer Mörtel lässt Flüssigkeit abperlen

25.07.2016 | Materialwissenschaften

Sichere Nutzung von Wasserstoff für die Energiewende

25.07.2016 | Energie und Elektrotechnik