Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

MIT makes move toward vehicles that morph

23.03.2006


Picture a bird, effortlessly adjusting its wings to catch every current of air. Airplanes that could do the same would have many advantages over today’s flying machines, including increased fuel efficiency.

Now MIT engineers report they may have found a way for structures -- and materials -- to move in this way, essentially morphing from one shape into another.

The discovery could lead to an airplane that morphs on demand from the shape that is most energy efficient to another better suited to agility, or to a boat whose hull changes shape to allow more efficient movement in choppy, calm or shallow waters.

This science-fiction outcome, in the works for 20 years, has been unobtainable with such conventional devices as hydraulics, which aren’t practical for a variety of reasons -- from cost to weight to ease of movement.

MIT’s work involves a new application of a familiar device: the rechargeable battery. Papers describing the team’s progress appeared earlier this year in Advanced Functional Materials and Electrochemical and Solid-State Letters.

Batteries expand and contract as they are charged and recharged. "This has generally been thought to be something detrimental to batteries. But I thought we could use this behavior to another end: the actuation, or movement, of large-scale structures," said Yet-Ming Chiang, the Kyocera Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE).

Chiang and Professor Steven R. Hall of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics led a team that also includes MSE graduate student Timothy E. Chin and postdoctoral associate Yukinori Koyama, aero-astro graduate student Fernando Tubilla and postdoctoral associate Kyung Yeol Song, and three visiting students, Urs Rhyner (from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH-Zurich) and Dimitrios Sapnaras and Georg Baetz (University of Karlsruhe, Germany).

Several types of "active" materials are already used to move devices ranging from miniature motors to micropositioners. None, however, "can enable the large-scale structural morphing we’ve been working toward," Hall said.

For example, some "smart materials" called piezoelectrics can change shape in less than the blink of an eye, but they do so on almost a microscopic level. They wouldn’t be capable of moving a wing the distance necessary to affect flight.

Similarly, shape-memory alloys have characteristics useful to large-scale actuation, but they require temperature control to work. "So to make them work you’ve got to keep them warm and insulate them. And if you insulate them, it takes a long time to cool them down if you want them to return to their original shape," Hall said. Those are not exactly optimum conditions for seamless morphing.

In the quest for materials that would allow such morphing, engineers have recently focused on nature’s approach to the problem. A plant that bends toward the light, quickly furls its leaves when touched, or pushes a concrete sidewalk aloft with its roots is essentially moving fluids between cells.

Chiang realized that the solid compounds used to store electrical energy in lithium rechargeable batteries could be made to work in a similar way. The movement of ions to and from these materials during charging and recharging, he thought, was analogous to the moving fluids in plants. Could this be a synthetic counterpart to nature’s solution?

To find out, Chiang and Hall began testing commercially available rechargeable batteries of a prismatic form, then designed their own devices composed of graphite posts surrounded by a lithium source. The results were promising.

Among other things, they found that the batteries continued to expand and contract under tremendous stresses, a must for devices that will be changing the shape of, say, a stiff helicopter rotor that’s also exposed to aerodynamic forces.

Other key advantages of the approach: The electrically activated batteries can operate at low voltages (less than five volts) as compared to the hundreds of volts required by piezoelectrics. The materials that make up the batteries are also inherently light. "For things that fly, weight is important," Hall said.

The researchers have already demonstrated basic battery-based actuators that can pull and push with large force. Later this year, they hope to demonstrate the shape-morphing of a helicopter rotor blade. The morphing capability should allow for a more efficient design, ultimately making it possible for a vehicle to carry heavier loads. Team members say that other applications, including miniaturized devices for Micro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), may flow from these initial demonstrations.

The researchers emphasize that much work remains to be done, such as refining the design of the battery for optimal operation in a morphing vehicle. Chiang notes, however, that "we’ve been able to demonstrate the potential of this approach even using these very unoptimized off-the-shelf batteries."

This work was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Elizabeth A. Thomson | MIT News Office
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.mit.edu

Weitere Berichte zu: Chiang MSE

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Energie und Elektrotechnik:

nachricht Graduiertenschule HyPerCells entwickelt hocheffiziente Perowskit- Dünnschichtsolarzelle
17.08.2017 | Universität Potsdam

nachricht Lasersensoren LAH-G1 – Optische Abstandssensoren mit Messwertanzeige
15.08.2017 | WayCon Positionsmesstechnik GmbH

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Energie und Elektrotechnik >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Topologische Quantenzustände einfach aufspüren

Durch gezieltes Aufheizen von Quantenmaterie können exotische Materiezustände aufgespürt werden. Zu diesem überraschenden Ergebnis kommen Theoretische Physiker um Nathan Goldman (Brüssel) und Peter Zoller (Innsbruck) in einer aktuellen Arbeit im Fachmagazin Science Advances. Sie liefern damit ein universell einsetzbares Werkzeug für die Suche nach topologischen Quantenzuständen.

In der Physik existieren gewisse Größen nur als ganzzahlige Vielfache elementarer und unteilbarer Bestandteile. Wie das antike Konzept des Atoms bezeugt, ist...

Im Focus: Unterwasserroboter soll nach einem Jahr in der arktischen Tiefsee auftauchen

Am Dienstag, den 22. August wird das Forschungsschiff Polarstern im norwegischen Tromsø zu einer besonderen Expedition in die Arktis starten: Der autonome Unterwasserroboter TRAMPER soll nach einem Jahr Einsatzzeit am arktischen Tiefseeboden auftauchen. Dieses Gerät und weitere robotische Systeme, die Tiefsee- und Weltraumforscher im Rahmen der Helmholtz-Allianz ROBEX gemeinsam entwickelt haben, werden nun knapp drei Wochen lang unter Realbedingungen getestet. ROBEX hat das Ziel, neue Technologien für die Erkundung schwer erreichbarer Gebiete mit extremen Umweltbedingungen zu entwickeln.

„Auftauchen wird der TRAMPER“, sagt Dr. Frank Wenzhöfer vom Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung (AWI) selbstbewusst. Der...

Im Focus: Mit Barcodes der Zellentwicklung auf der Spur

Darüber, wie sich Blutzellen entwickeln, existieren verschiedene Auffassungen – sie basieren jedoch fast ausschließlich auf Experimenten, die lediglich Momentaufnahmen widerspiegeln. Wissenschaftler des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums stellen nun im Fachjournal Nature eine neue Technik vor, mit der sich das Geschehen dynamisch erfassen lässt: Mithilfe eines „Zufallsgenerators“ versehen sie Blutstammzellen mit genetischen Barcodes und können so verfolgen, welche Zelltypen aus der Stammzelle hervorgehen. Diese Technik erlaubt künftig völlig neue Einblicke in die Entwicklung unterschiedlicher Gewebe sowie in die Krebsentstehung.

Wie entsteht die Vielzahl verschiedener Zelltypen im Blut? Diese Frage beschäftigt Wissenschaftler schon lange. Nach der klassischen Vorstellung fächern sich...

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Forscher entwickeln maisförmigen Arzneimittel-Transporter zum Inhalieren

Er sieht aus wie ein Maiskolben, ist winzig wie ein Bakterium und kann einen Wirkstoff direkt in die Lungenzellen liefern: Das zylinderförmige Vehikel für Arzneistoffe, das Pharmazeuten der Universität des Saarlandes entwickelt haben, kann inhaliert werden. Professor Marc Schneider und sein Team machen sich dabei die körpereigene Abwehr zunutze: Makrophagen, die Fresszellen des Immunsystems, fressen den gesundheitlich unbedenklichen „Nano-Mais“ und setzen dabei den in ihm enthaltenen Wirkstoff frei. Bei ihrer Forschung arbeiteten die Pharmazeuten mit Forschern der Medizinischen Fakultät der Saar-Uni, des Leibniz-Instituts für Neue Materialien und der Universität Marburg zusammen Ihre Forschungsergebnisse veröffentlichten die Wissenschaftler in der Fachzeitschrift Advanced Healthcare Materials. DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700478

Ein Medikament wirkt nur, wenn es dort ankommt, wo es wirken soll. Wird ein Mittel inhaliert, muss der Wirkstoff in der Lunge zuerst die Hindernisse...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

International führende Informatiker in Paderborn

21.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Wissenschaftliche Grundlagen für eine erfolgreiche Klimapolitik

21.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

DGI-Forum in Wittenberg: Fake News und Stimmungsmache im Netz

21.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Im Neptun regnet es Diamanten: Forscherteam enthüllt Innenleben kosmischer Eisgiganten

21.08.2017 | Physik Astronomie

Ein Holodeck für Fliegen, Fische und Mäuse

21.08.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Institut für Lufttransportsysteme der TUHH nimmt neuen Cockpitsimulator in Betrieb

21.08.2017 | Verkehr Logistik