Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

MIT makes move toward vehicles that morph

23.03.2006


Picture a bird, effortlessly adjusting its wings to catch every current of air. Airplanes that could do the same would have many advantages over today’s flying machines, including increased fuel efficiency.

Now MIT engineers report they may have found a way for structures -- and materials -- to move in this way, essentially morphing from one shape into another.

The discovery could lead to an airplane that morphs on demand from the shape that is most energy efficient to another better suited to agility, or to a boat whose hull changes shape to allow more efficient movement in choppy, calm or shallow waters.

This science-fiction outcome, in the works for 20 years, has been unobtainable with such conventional devices as hydraulics, which aren’t practical for a variety of reasons -- from cost to weight to ease of movement.

MIT’s work involves a new application of a familiar device: the rechargeable battery. Papers describing the team’s progress appeared earlier this year in Advanced Functional Materials and Electrochemical and Solid-State Letters.

Batteries expand and contract as they are charged and recharged. "This has generally been thought to be something detrimental to batteries. But I thought we could use this behavior to another end: the actuation, or movement, of large-scale structures," said Yet-Ming Chiang, the Kyocera Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE).

Chiang and Professor Steven R. Hall of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics led a team that also includes MSE graduate student Timothy E. Chin and postdoctoral associate Yukinori Koyama, aero-astro graduate student Fernando Tubilla and postdoctoral associate Kyung Yeol Song, and three visiting students, Urs Rhyner (from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH-Zurich) and Dimitrios Sapnaras and Georg Baetz (University of Karlsruhe, Germany).

Several types of "active" materials are already used to move devices ranging from miniature motors to micropositioners. None, however, "can enable the large-scale structural morphing we’ve been working toward," Hall said.

For example, some "smart materials" called piezoelectrics can change shape in less than the blink of an eye, but they do so on almost a microscopic level. They wouldn’t be capable of moving a wing the distance necessary to affect flight.

Similarly, shape-memory alloys have characteristics useful to large-scale actuation, but they require temperature control to work. "So to make them work you’ve got to keep them warm and insulate them. And if you insulate them, it takes a long time to cool them down if you want them to return to their original shape," Hall said. Those are not exactly optimum conditions for seamless morphing.

In the quest for materials that would allow such morphing, engineers have recently focused on nature’s approach to the problem. A plant that bends toward the light, quickly furls its leaves when touched, or pushes a concrete sidewalk aloft with its roots is essentially moving fluids between cells.

Chiang realized that the solid compounds used to store electrical energy in lithium rechargeable batteries could be made to work in a similar way. The movement of ions to and from these materials during charging and recharging, he thought, was analogous to the moving fluids in plants. Could this be a synthetic counterpart to nature’s solution?

To find out, Chiang and Hall began testing commercially available rechargeable batteries of a prismatic form, then designed their own devices composed of graphite posts surrounded by a lithium source. The results were promising.

Among other things, they found that the batteries continued to expand and contract under tremendous stresses, a must for devices that will be changing the shape of, say, a stiff helicopter rotor that’s also exposed to aerodynamic forces.

Other key advantages of the approach: The electrically activated batteries can operate at low voltages (less than five volts) as compared to the hundreds of volts required by piezoelectrics. The materials that make up the batteries are also inherently light. "For things that fly, weight is important," Hall said.

The researchers have already demonstrated basic battery-based actuators that can pull and push with large force. Later this year, they hope to demonstrate the shape-morphing of a helicopter rotor blade. The morphing capability should allow for a more efficient design, ultimately making it possible for a vehicle to carry heavier loads. Team members say that other applications, including miniaturized devices for Micro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), may flow from these initial demonstrations.

The researchers emphasize that much work remains to be done, such as refining the design of the battery for optimal operation in a morphing vehicle. Chiang notes, however, that "we’ve been able to demonstrate the potential of this approach even using these very unoptimized off-the-shelf batteries."

This work was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Elizabeth A. Thomson | MIT News Office
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.mit.edu

Weitere Berichte zu: Chiang MSE

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Energie und Elektrotechnik:

nachricht Wärme in Strom: Thermoelektrische Generatoren aus Nanoschichten
16.03.2017 | Universität Duisburg-Essen

nachricht Flüssiger Treibstoff für künftige Computer
15.03.2017 | Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETH Zürich)

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Energie und Elektrotechnik >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wegweisende Erkenntnisse für die Biomedizin: NAD⁺ hilft bei Reparatur geschädigter Erbinformationen

Eine internationale Forschergruppe mit dem Bayreuther Biochemiker Prof. Dr. Clemens Steegborn präsentiert in 'Science' neue, für die Biomedizin wegweisende Forschungsergebnisse zur Rolle des Moleküls NAD⁺ bei der Korrektur von Schäden am Erbgut.

Die Zellen von Menschen und Tieren können Schäden an der DNA, dem Träger der Erbinformation, bis zu einem gewissen Umfang selbst reparieren. Diese Fähigkeit...

Im Focus: Designer-Proteine falten DNA

Florian Praetorius und Prof. Hendrik Dietz von der Technischen Universität München (TUM) haben eine neue Methode entwickelt, mit deren Hilfe sie definierte Hybrid-Strukturen aus DNA und Proteinen aufbauen können. Die Methode eröffnet Möglichkeiten für die zellbiologische Grundlagenforschung und für die Anwendung in Medizin und Biotechnologie.

Desoxyribonukleinsäure – besser bekannt unter der englischen Abkürzung DNA – ist die Trägerin unserer Erbinformation. Für Prof. Hendrik Dietz und Florian...

Im Focus: Fliegende Intensivstationen: Ultraschallgeräte in Rettungshubschraubern können Leben retten

Etwa 21 Millionen Menschen treffen jährlich in deutschen Notaufnahmen ein. Im Kampf zwischen Leben und Tod zählt für diese Patienten jede Minute. Wenn sie schon kurz nach dem Unfall zielgerichtet behandelt werden können, verbessern sich ihre Überlebenschancen erheblich. Damit Notfallmediziner in solchen Fällen schnell die richtige Diagnose stellen können, kommen in den Rettungshubschraubern der DRF Luftrettung und zunehmend auch in Notarzteinsatzfahrzeugen mobile Ultraschallgeräte zum Einsatz. Experten der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Ultraschall in der Medizin e.V. (DEGUM) schulen die Notärzte und Rettungsassistenten.

Mit mobilen Ultraschallgeräten können Notärzte beispielsweise innere Blutungen direkt am Unfallort identifizieren und sie bei Bedarf auch für Untersuchungen im...

Im Focus: Gigantische Magnetfelder im Universum

Astronomen aus Bonn und Tautenburg in Thüringen beobachteten mit dem 100-m-Radioteleskop Effelsberg Galaxienhaufen, das sind Ansammlungen von Sternsystemen, heißem Gas und geladenen Teilchen. An den Rändern dieser Galaxienhaufen fanden sie außergewöhnlich geordnete Magnetfelder, die sich über viele Millionen Lichtjahre erstrecken. Sie stellen die größten bekannten Magnetfelder im Universum dar.

Die Ergebnisse werden am 22. März in der Fachzeitschrift „Astronomy & Astrophysics“ veröffentlicht.

Galaxienhaufen sind die größten gravitativ gebundenen Strukturen im Universum, mit einer Ausdehnung von etwa zehn Millionen Lichtjahren. Im Vergleich dazu ist...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Rund 500 Fachleute aus Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft diskutierten über technologische Zukunftsthemen

24.03.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Lebenswichtige Lebensmittelchemie

23.03.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Die „Panama Papers“ aus Programmierersicht

22.03.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Rund 500 Fachleute aus Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft diskutierten über technologische Zukunftsthemen

24.03.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Förderung des Instituts für Lasertechnik und Messtechnik in Ulm mit rund 1,63 Millionen Euro

24.03.2017 | Förderungen Preise

TU-Bauingenieure koordinieren EU-Projekt zu Recycling-Beton von über sieben Millionen Euro

24.03.2017 | Förderungen Preise