Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

MIT makes move toward vehicles that morph

23.03.2006


Picture a bird, effortlessly adjusting its wings to catch every current of air. Airplanes that could do the same would have many advantages over today’s flying machines, including increased fuel efficiency.

Now MIT engineers report they may have found a way for structures -- and materials -- to move in this way, essentially morphing from one shape into another.

The discovery could lead to an airplane that morphs on demand from the shape that is most energy efficient to another better suited to agility, or to a boat whose hull changes shape to allow more efficient movement in choppy, calm or shallow waters.

This science-fiction outcome, in the works for 20 years, has been unobtainable with such conventional devices as hydraulics, which aren’t practical for a variety of reasons -- from cost to weight to ease of movement.

MIT’s work involves a new application of a familiar device: the rechargeable battery. Papers describing the team’s progress appeared earlier this year in Advanced Functional Materials and Electrochemical and Solid-State Letters.

Batteries expand and contract as they are charged and recharged. "This has generally been thought to be something detrimental to batteries. But I thought we could use this behavior to another end: the actuation, or movement, of large-scale structures," said Yet-Ming Chiang, the Kyocera Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE).

Chiang and Professor Steven R. Hall of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics led a team that also includes MSE graduate student Timothy E. Chin and postdoctoral associate Yukinori Koyama, aero-astro graduate student Fernando Tubilla and postdoctoral associate Kyung Yeol Song, and three visiting students, Urs Rhyner (from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH-Zurich) and Dimitrios Sapnaras and Georg Baetz (University of Karlsruhe, Germany).

Several types of "active" materials are already used to move devices ranging from miniature motors to micropositioners. None, however, "can enable the large-scale structural morphing we’ve been working toward," Hall said.

For example, some "smart materials" called piezoelectrics can change shape in less than the blink of an eye, but they do so on almost a microscopic level. They wouldn’t be capable of moving a wing the distance necessary to affect flight.

Similarly, shape-memory alloys have characteristics useful to large-scale actuation, but they require temperature control to work. "So to make them work you’ve got to keep them warm and insulate them. And if you insulate them, it takes a long time to cool them down if you want them to return to their original shape," Hall said. Those are not exactly optimum conditions for seamless morphing.

In the quest for materials that would allow such morphing, engineers have recently focused on nature’s approach to the problem. A plant that bends toward the light, quickly furls its leaves when touched, or pushes a concrete sidewalk aloft with its roots is essentially moving fluids between cells.

Chiang realized that the solid compounds used to store electrical energy in lithium rechargeable batteries could be made to work in a similar way. The movement of ions to and from these materials during charging and recharging, he thought, was analogous to the moving fluids in plants. Could this be a synthetic counterpart to nature’s solution?

To find out, Chiang and Hall began testing commercially available rechargeable batteries of a prismatic form, then designed their own devices composed of graphite posts surrounded by a lithium source. The results were promising.

Among other things, they found that the batteries continued to expand and contract under tremendous stresses, a must for devices that will be changing the shape of, say, a stiff helicopter rotor that’s also exposed to aerodynamic forces.

Other key advantages of the approach: The electrically activated batteries can operate at low voltages (less than five volts) as compared to the hundreds of volts required by piezoelectrics. The materials that make up the batteries are also inherently light. "For things that fly, weight is important," Hall said.

The researchers have already demonstrated basic battery-based actuators that can pull and push with large force. Later this year, they hope to demonstrate the shape-morphing of a helicopter rotor blade. The morphing capability should allow for a more efficient design, ultimately making it possible for a vehicle to carry heavier loads. Team members say that other applications, including miniaturized devices for Micro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), may flow from these initial demonstrations.

The researchers emphasize that much work remains to be done, such as refining the design of the battery for optimal operation in a morphing vehicle. Chiang notes, however, that "we’ve been able to demonstrate the potential of this approach even using these very unoptimized off-the-shelf batteries."

This work was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Elizabeth A. Thomson | MIT News Office
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.mit.edu

Weitere Berichte zu: Chiang MSE

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Energie und Elektrotechnik:

nachricht Höhere Energieeffizienz durch Brennhilfsmittel aus Porenkeramik
05.12.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Silicatforschung ISC

nachricht Planungstool für die Energiewende: Open Source Plattform für Stromnetze
05.12.2016 | Technische Universität München

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Energie und Elektrotechnik >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Greifswalder Forscher dringen mit superauflösendem Mikroskop in zellulären Mikrokosmos ein

Das Institut für Anatomie und Zellbiologie weiht am Montag, 05.12.2016, mit einem wissenschaftlichen Symposium das erste Superresolution-Mikroskop in Greifswald ein. Das Forschungsmikroskop wurde von der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) und dem Land Mecklenburg-Vorpommern finanziert. Nun können die Greifswalder Wissenschaftler Strukturen bis zu einer Größe von einigen Millionstel Millimetern mittels Laserlicht sichtbar machen.

Weit über hundert Jahre lang galt die von Ernst Abbe 1873 publizierte Theorie zur Auflösungsgrenze von Lichtmikroskopen als ein in Stein gemeißeltes Gesetz....

Im Focus: Durchbruch in der Diabetesforschung: Pankreaszellen produzieren Insulin durch Malariamedikament

Artemisinine, eine zugelassene Wirkstoffgruppe gegen Malaria, wandelt Glukagon-produzierende Alpha-Zellen der Bauchspeicheldrüse (Pankreas) in insulinproduzierende Zellen um – genau die Zellen, die bei Typ-1-Diabetes geschädigt sind. Das haben Forscher des CeMM Forschungszentrum für Molekulare Medizin der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften im Rahmen einer internationalen Zusammenarbeit mit modernsten Einzelzell-Analysen herausgefunden. Ihre bahnbrechenden Ergebnisse werden in Cell publiziert und liefern eine vielversprechende Grundlage für neue Therapien gegen Typ-1 Diabetes.

Seit einigen Jahren hatten sich Forscher an diesem Kunstgriff versucht, der eine simple und elegante Heilung des Typ-1 Diabetes versprach: Die vom eigenen...

Im Focus: Makromoleküle: Mit Licht zu Präzisionspolymeren

Chemikern am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) ist es gelungen, den Aufbau von Präzisionspolymeren durch lichtgetriebene chemische Reaktionen gezielt zu steuern. Das Verfahren ermöglicht die genaue, geplante Platzierung der Kettengliedern, den Monomeren, entlang von Polymerketten einheitlicher Länge. Die präzise aufgebauten Makromoleküle bilden festgelegte Eigenschaften aus und eignen sich möglicherweise als Informationsspeicher oder synthetische Biomoleküle. Über die neuartige Synthesereaktion berichten die Wissenschaftler nun in der Open Access Publikation Nature Communications. (DOI: 10.1038/NCOMMS13672)

Chemische Reaktionen lassen sich durch Einwirken von Licht bei Zimmertemperatur auslösen. Die Forscher am KIT nutzen diesen Effekt, um unter Licht die...

Im Focus: Neuer Sensor: Was im Inneren von Schneelawinen vor sich geht

Ein neuer Radarsensor erlaubt Einblicke in die inneren Vorgänge von Schneelawinen. Entwickelt haben ihn Ingenieure der Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) um Dr. Christoph Baer und Timo Jaeschke gemeinsam mit Kollegen aus Innsbruck und Davos. Das Messsystem ist bereits an einem Testhang im Wallis installiert, wo das Schweizer Institut für Schnee- und Lawinenforschung im Winter 2016/17 Messungen damit durchführen möchte.

Die erhobenen Daten sollen in Simulationen einfließen, die das komplexe Geschehen im Inneren von Lawinen detailliert nachbilden. „Was genau passiert, wenn sich...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Von „Coopetition“ bis „Digitale Union“ – Die Fertigungsindustrien im digitalen Wandel

02.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Experten diskutieren Perspektiven schrumpfender Regionen

01.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Die Perspektiven der Genom-Editierung in der Landwirtschaft

01.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Höhere Energieeffizienz durch Brennhilfsmittel aus Porenkeramik

05.12.2016 | Energie und Elektrotechnik

Neue Perspektiven durch gespiegelte Systeme

05.12.2016 | Physik Astronomie

Forscher finden «Krebssignatur» in Proteinen

05.12.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie