Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Ames Laboratory scientists develop indium-free organic light-emitting diodes

04.12.2012
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered new ways of using a well-known polymer in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), which could eliminate the need for an increasingly problematic and breakable metal-oxide used in screen displays in computers, televisions, and cell phones.

The metal-oxide, indium tin oxide (ITO), is a transparent conductor used as the anode for flat screen displays, and has been the standard for decades. Due to indium's limited supply, increasing cost and the increasing demand for its use in screen and lighting technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy has designated indium as "near-critical" in its assessment of materials vital to clean energy technology. Scientists have been working to find an energy efficient, cost effective substitute.

“There are not many materials that are both transparent and electrically conductive,” said Joseph Shinar, an Ames Laboratory Senior Scientist. “One hundred percent of commercial display devices in the world use ITO as the transparent conducting electrode. There’s been a big push for many years to find alternatives.”

“Everybody is trying to find a replacement for ITO, many working with zinc oxide, another metal oxide. But here we are working towards something different, developing ways to use a conducting polymer,” said Min Cai, a post-doctoral research scientist in the Ames Laboratory and the Dept. of Physics and Astronomy at Iowa State University.

The polymer’s name is a mouthful of a word: poly (3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate), known as PEDOT:PSS for short, and has been around for about 15 years. Until recently, the material wasn’t sufficiently conductive or transparent enough to be a viable ITO substitute, Shinar said. But by using a multi-layering technique and special treatments, Cai and his fellow scientists were able to fabricate PEDOT:PSS OLEDs with vastly improved properties.

“Compared to an ITO anode device, the PEDOT:PSS device is at least 44 percent more efficient,” said Cai. According to Joe

Shinar, that gain in efficiency over ITO-based technology is the highest yet recorded.

The researchers used computer simulations to show that the enhanced performance is largely an effect of the difference in the optical properties between the polymer- and ITO-based devices.

Another key property of PEDOT:PSS is flexibility; using ITO in OLEDs defeats one of OLED’s big pluses compared to conventional LED technology.

“OLEDs can be made on a flexible substrate, which is one of their principal advantages over LEDs. But ITO is ceramic in nature; it is brittle rather than flexible,” said Ruth Shinar, a Senior Scientist at Iowa State University’s Microelectronics Research Center.

The findings, co-authored by Joseph Shinar and Ruth Shinar along with Min Cai, Zhuo Ye, Teng Xiao, Rui Liu, Ying Chen, Robert W. Mayer, Rana Biswas, and Kai-Ming Ho, were recently published in Advanced Materials, one of the most prominent journals in materials science and engineering.

The research builds on continuing work to find more affordable and efficient manufacturing materials and processes for OLED manufacturing. An earlier paper published in Advanced Materials by Joseph Shinar and Ruth Shinar along with Min Cai , Teng Xiao , Emily Hellerich , and Ying Chen demonstrated the use of solution processing for small molecule-based OLEDs, which are typically constructed using a more expensive thermal evaporation deposition process.

The scientists’ ongoing investigations into better materials and processes pave the way to more cost-efficient manufacturing and making OLED technology more widely available to consumers.

Joseph Shinar said that OLED televisions were already available to a limited high-end consumer, and that prices would come down as major manufacturers perfected their production processes. Both Samsung and LG exhibited a 55-inch OLED TV as a highlight feature of the 2012 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas in January.

“We are already getting there with OLED televisions. Consumers will see them getting more affordable and more widely available in the very near future,” said Joseph Shinar.

Shinar said the technology was also beginning to be used in lighting, in applications where diffuse light is preferred instead of point source lighting, and in architectural and art design.
The research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. DOE’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit the Office of Science website at science.energy.gov/.

The Ames Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory operated by Iowa State University. The Ames Laboratory creates innovative materials, technologies and energy solutions. We use our expertise, unique capabilities and interdisciplinary collaborations to solve global problems.

Laura Millsaps | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ameslab.gov

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Mission possible: This device will self-destruct when heated
22.05.2015 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

nachricht Gamma ray camera may help with Fukushima decontamination*
21.05.2015 | Waseda University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Kieler Forschende bauen die kleinsten Maschinen der Welt

Die DFG stellt Millionenförderung für die Entwicklung neuartiger Medikamente und Materialien an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (CAU) bereit.

Großer Jubel an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (CAU): Wie die Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) heute (Donnerstag, 21. Mai) bekannt gab,...

Im Focus: Basler Physiker entwickeln Methode zur effizienten Signalübertragung aus Nanobauteilen

Physiker haben eine innovative Methode entwickelt, die den effizienten Einsatz von Nanobauteilen in elektronische Schaltkreisen ermöglichen könnte. Sie entwickelten dazu eine Anordnung, bei der ein Nanobauteil mit zwei elektrischen Leitern verbunden ist. Diese bewirken eine hocheffiziente Auskopplung des elektrischen Signals. Die Wissenschaftler vom Departement Physik und dem Swiss Nanoscience Institute der Universität Basel haben ihre Ergebnisse zusammen mit Kollegen der ETH Zürich in der Fachzeitschrift «Nature Communications» publiziert.

Elektronische Bauteile werden immer kleiner. In Forschungslabors werden bereits Bauelemente von wenigen Nanometern hergestellt, was ungefähr der Grösse von...

Im Focus: Basel Physicists Develop Efficient Method of Signal Transmission from Nanocomponents

Physicists have developed an innovative method that could enable the efficient use of nanocomponents in electronic circuits. To achieve this, they have developed a layout in which a nanocomponent is connected to two electrical conductors, which uncouple the electrical signal in a highly efficient manner. The scientists at the Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel have published their results in the scientific journal “Nature Communications” together with their colleagues from ETH Zurich.

Electronic components are becoming smaller and smaller. Components measuring just a few nanometers – the size of around ten atoms – are already being produced...

Im Focus: Phagen übertragen Antibiotikaresistenzen auf Bakterien – Nachweis auf Geflügelfleisch

Bakterien entwickeln immer häufiger Resistenzen gegenüber Antibiotika. Es gibt unterschiedliche Erklärungen dafür, wie diese Resistenzen in die Bakterien gelangen. Forschende der Vetmeduni Vienna fanden sogenannte Phagen auf Geflügelfleisch, die Antibiotikaresistenzen auf Bakterien übertragen können. Phagen sind Viren, die ausschließlich Bakterien infizieren können. Für Menschen sind sie unschädlich. Phagen könnten laut Studie jedoch zur Verbreitung von Antibiotikaresistenzen beitragen. Die Erkenntnisse sind nicht nur für die Lebensmittelproduktion sondern auch für die Medizin von Bedeutung. Die Studie wurde in der Fachzeitschrift Applied and Environmental Microbiology veröffentlicht.

Antibiotikaresistente Bakterien stellen weltweit ein bedeutendes Gesundheitsrisiko dar. Gängige Antibiotika sind bei der Behandlung von Infektionskrankheiten...

Im Focus: Die schreckliche Schönheit der Medusa

Astronomen haben mit dem Very Large Telescope der ESO in Chile das bisher detailgetreueste Bild vom Medusa-Nebel eingefangen, das je aufgenommen wurde. Als der Stern im Herzen dieses Nebels altersschwach wurde, hat er seine äußeren Schichten abgestoßen, aus denen sich diese farbenfrohe Wolke bildete. Das Bild lässt erahnen, welches endgültige Schicksal die Sonne einmal ereilen wird: Irgendwann wird aus ihr ebenfalls ein Objekt dieser Art werden.

Dieser wunderschöne Planetarische Nebel ist nach einer schrecklichen Kreatur aus der griechischen Mythologie benannt – der Gorgone Medusa. Er trägt auch die...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

TU Darmstadt: Gipfel der Verschlüsselung - CROSSING-Konferenz am 1. und 2. Juni in Darmstadt

22.05.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Internationale neurowissenschaftliche Tagung

22.05.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Biokohle-Forscher tagen in Potsdam

21.05.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Nanogefäß mit einer Perle aus Gold

22.05.2015 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Ferngesteuerte Mikroschwimmer: Jülicher Physiker simulieren Bewegungen von Bakterien an Oberflächen

22.05.2015 | Physik Astronomie

Was Chromosomen im Innersten zusammenhält

22.05.2015 | Biowissenschaften Chemie