Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Uncovering Pathogens Outside the Lab

12.02.2013
DNAzymes and gold nanoparticles: a colorimetric assay for diagnostics in the field

Infectious diseases such as malaria and syphilis can be diagnosed rapidly and reliably in the field by using a simple test developed by Canadian scientists. The test is based on the use of DNAzymes and gold nanoparticles. As the researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their test allows for the sensitive detection of bacteria, viruses, and parasites.

Dangerous infectious diseases must be identified in time in order to prevent them from spreading. The DNA of pathogens is an ideal biomarker and can easily be identified by PCR. However, this is only possible if expensive laboratory equipment and trained personnel are on hand. This may not be the case in remote locations or developing nations. Alternative methods that are simple and inexpensive while also remaining sensitive and specific are needed.

Kyryl Zagorovsky and Warren C.W. Chan at the University of Toronto (Canada) have now combined two modern technologies in a novel way: They have used DNAzymes as signal amplifiers and gold nanoparticles for detection. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) absorb light. The wavelength of the light absorbed depends on whether the nanoparticles are separate or aggregated. The difference in color can be seen with the naked eye. A solution of individual particles appears red, whereas aggregates are blue-violet in color.

DNAzymes are synthetic DNA molecules that can enzymatically split other nucleic acid molecules. The researchers separated a DNAzyme into two inactive halves that both selectively bind to a specific gene segment of the pathogen to be detected. The act of binding reunites the halves and activates them.

For their test procedure, the scientists produced two sets of GNPs that bind to two different types of DNA strand, type A and type B. In addition, they synthesized a three-part “linker” made of DNA. One end of the linker is the complement to type A DNA; the second end is the complement to type B DNA. The center part is designed to be split by active DNAzymes.

In the test sample with no pathogen present, the DNAzymes remain inactive and the linkers remain intact. They bind to a GNP at each end and link the GNPs into larger aggregates, causing the solution to turn blue-violet. In contrast, if there is pathogen in the sample, the DNAzymes are activated and proceed to split the linkers. Now only the bridging parts of the linker can bind to DNA strands of the GNPs, so they cannot link the GNPs together. The solution stays red. Because every activated DNAzyme splits many linkers, it amplifies the signal.

This new type of test is simple and inexpensive; it can be made to detect every kind of pathogen, as the researchers demonstrated by detecting gonorrhea, syphilis, malaria, and hepatitis B. In a freeze-dried state, the reagents can be stored with no problem – an important requirement for use in the field.

For the full article see https://www.wiley-vch.de/vch/journals/2001/journalist/201305pre.pdf (editorial use only).

About the Author
Dr. Warren Chan is a professor at the University of Toronto in the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering with affiliation with the Donnelly Center for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering. His research interest is in the development of nanotechnology for detecting cancer and infectious diseases. He is also the Canadian Research Chair in Nanomedicine.

Author: Warren C. W. Chan, University of Toronto (Canada), http://ibbme.utoronto.ca/faculty/core/chan.htm

Title: A Plasmonic DNAzyme Strategy for Point-of-Care Genetic Detection of Infectious Pathogens

Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201208715

Warren C. W. Chan | Angewandte Chemie
Further information:
http://pressroom.angewandte.org
http://ibbme.utoronto.ca/faculty/core/chan.htm

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New Technique Maps Elusive Chemical Markers on Proteins
03.07.2015 | Salk Institute for Biological Studies

nachricht New approach to targeted cancer therapy
03.07.2015 | CECAD - Cluster of Excellence at the University of Cologne

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Forschungsschiff Heincke seit 25 Jahren im Dienst der Wissenschaft

Ein Vierteljahrhundert alt, über 900.000 Kilometer (488.842 nautische Meilen) gefahren und trotzdem auf dem neuesten wissenschaftlichen und technischen Stand: Die Indienststellung des Forschungsschiffes Heincke jährt sich am 8. Juli 2015 zum 25. Mal.

Wissenschaftler des Alfred-Wegener-Instituts, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung (AWI), das die Heincke betreibt, nehmen ebenso regelmäßig an...

Im Focus: Solardächer produzieren Strom für Fahrzeuge

Studentische Industriekooperation zwischen HAW Hamburg und Webasto erarbeitet Ergebnisse für EU-Zertifizierungsprozess von Solardächern zur Verbesserung der Öko-Bilanz von Fahrzeugen.

Unter der Leitung von Dr.-Ing. Volker Skwarek, Professor für technische Informatik an der HAW Hamburg, erarbeiteten sechs Studierende des...

Im Focus: Viaducts with wind turbines, the new renewable energy source

Wind turbines could be installed under some of the biggest bridges on the road network to produce electricity. So it is confirmed by calculations carried out by a European researchers team, that have taken a viaduct in the Canary Islands as a reference. This concept could be applied in heavily built-up territories or natural areas with new constructions limitations.

The Juncal Viaduct, in Gran Canaria, has served as a reference for Spanish and British researchers to verify that the wind blowing between the pillars on this...

Im Focus: Aus alt mach neu - Rohstoffquelle Elektroschrott

Der Markt für Unterhaltungselektronik boomt: Rund 60 Millionen Fernsehgeräte wurden im letzten Jahr in Europa verkauft. Früher oder später werden sie zurückkehren – als Elektroschrott.

Die Recycling-Industrie hat darauf reagiert: Kupfer, Aluminium, Eisen- und Edelmetalle sowie ausgewählte Kunststoffe werden bereits wiederverwertet. Allerdings...

Im Focus: Radar schützt vor Weltraummüll

Die Bedrohung im All durch Weltraummüll ist groß. Aktive Satelliten und Raumfahrzeuge können beschädigt oder zerstört werden. Ein neues, nationales Weltraumüberwachungssystem soll ab 2018 vor Gefahren im Orbit schützen. Fraunhofer-Forscher entwickeln das Radar im Auftrag des DLR Raumfahrtmanagement.

Die »Verkehrssituation« im All ist angespannt: Neben unzähligen Satelliten umkreisen Weltraumtrümmer wie beispielsweise ausgebrannte Raketenstufen und...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Flurförderzeuge im Zeichen der Zeit

03.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Aktuelles aus Forschung und Betrieb: 27. Deutscher Flammentag

02.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Call for ideas: Gute Ideen für bessere Städte

02.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Siemens erhält Auftrag für Offshore-Windkraftwerk in Großbritannien

03.07.2015 | Unternehmensmeldung

Flurförderzeuge im Zeichen der Zeit

03.07.2015 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Kompakter Time Converter für zuverlässigen Einsatz in rauen Umgebungen

03.07.2015 | Energie und Elektrotechnik