Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 


Uncovering Pathogens Outside the Lab

DNAzymes and gold nanoparticles: a colorimetric assay for diagnostics in the field

Infectious diseases such as malaria and syphilis can be diagnosed rapidly and reliably in the field by using a simple test developed by Canadian scientists. The test is based on the use of DNAzymes and gold nanoparticles. As the researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their test allows for the sensitive detection of bacteria, viruses, and parasites.

Dangerous infectious diseases must be identified in time in order to prevent them from spreading. The DNA of pathogens is an ideal biomarker and can easily be identified by PCR. However, this is only possible if expensive laboratory equipment and trained personnel are on hand. This may not be the case in remote locations or developing nations. Alternative methods that are simple and inexpensive while also remaining sensitive and specific are needed.

Kyryl Zagorovsky and Warren C.W. Chan at the University of Toronto (Canada) have now combined two modern technologies in a novel way: They have used DNAzymes as signal amplifiers and gold nanoparticles for detection. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) absorb light. The wavelength of the light absorbed depends on whether the nanoparticles are separate or aggregated. The difference in color can be seen with the naked eye. A solution of individual particles appears red, whereas aggregates are blue-violet in color.

DNAzymes are synthetic DNA molecules that can enzymatically split other nucleic acid molecules. The researchers separated a DNAzyme into two inactive halves that both selectively bind to a specific gene segment of the pathogen to be detected. The act of binding reunites the halves and activates them.

For their test procedure, the scientists produced two sets of GNPs that bind to two different types of DNA strand, type A and type B. In addition, they synthesized a three-part “linker” made of DNA. One end of the linker is the complement to type A DNA; the second end is the complement to type B DNA. The center part is designed to be split by active DNAzymes.

In the test sample with no pathogen present, the DNAzymes remain inactive and the linkers remain intact. They bind to a GNP at each end and link the GNPs into larger aggregates, causing the solution to turn blue-violet. In contrast, if there is pathogen in the sample, the DNAzymes are activated and proceed to split the linkers. Now only the bridging parts of the linker can bind to DNA strands of the GNPs, so they cannot link the GNPs together. The solution stays red. Because every activated DNAzyme splits many linkers, it amplifies the signal.

This new type of test is simple and inexpensive; it can be made to detect every kind of pathogen, as the researchers demonstrated by detecting gonorrhea, syphilis, malaria, and hepatitis B. In a freeze-dried state, the reagents can be stored with no problem – an important requirement for use in the field.

For the full article see (editorial use only).

About the Author
Dr. Warren Chan is a professor at the University of Toronto in the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering with affiliation with the Donnelly Center for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering. His research interest is in the development of nanotechnology for detecting cancer and infectious diseases. He is also the Canadian Research Chair in Nanomedicine.

Author: Warren C. W. Chan, University of Toronto (Canada),

Title: A Plasmonic DNAzyme Strategy for Point-of-Care Genetic Detection of Infectious Pathogens

Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Permalink to the article:

Warren C. W. Chan | Angewandte Chemie
Further information:

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Molecular trigger for Cerebral Cavernous Malformation identified
26.11.2015 | EMBO - excellence in life sciences

nachricht Peering into cell structures where neurodiseases emerge
26.11.2015 | University of Delaware

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Klimawandel: Forscher weisen dramatische Veränderung in den 1980er Jahren nach

Ende der 1980er Jahre erlebte die Erde eine dramatische Klimaveränderung. Sie umfasste die Tiefen der Ozeane ebenso wie die obere Atmosphäre und reichte vom Nord- bis zum Südpol. Ausgelöst durch den Ausbruch des Vulkans El Chichón in Mexico 1982 und verstärkt durch menschliches Handeln folgte daraus die größte Temperaturverschiebung der letzten 1.000 Jahre. Erstmals nachgewiesen hat dies ein internationales Forscherteam um Prof. Philip C. Reid von der Plymouth University und der Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science (UK). Die Ergebnisse wurden kürzlich in der Fachzeitschrift „Global Change Biology“ veröffentlicht.

Abrupte Klimaveränderungen haben oft dramatische Folgen für unseren Planeten. Dennoch sind sie in ihrer Art, ihrem Ausmaß und in ihrer Wirkungsweise meist nur...

Im Focus: Climate study finds evidence of global shift in the 1980s

Planet Earth experienced a global climate shift in the late 1980s on an unprecedented scale, fuelled by anthropogenic warming and a volcanic eruption, according to new research published this week.

Scientists say that a major step change, or ‘regime shift’, in the Earth’s biophysical systems, from the upper atmosphere to the depths of the ocean and from...

Im Focus: Innovative Photovoltaik – vom Labor an die Fassade

Fraunhofer ISE demonstriert neue Zell- und Modultechnologien an der Außenfassade eines Laborgebäudes

Das Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE hat die Außenfassade eines seiner Laborgebäude mit 70 Photovoltaik-Modulen ausgerüstet. Die Module...

Im Focus: Innovative Photovoltaics – from the Lab to the Façade

Fraunhofer ISE Demonstrates New Cell and Module Technologies on its Outer Building Façade

The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE has installed 70 photovoltaic modules on the outer façade of one of its lab buildings. The modules were...

Im Focus: Follow Me: Forscher der Jacobs University steuern Unterwasser-Roboter erstmals durch Zeichensprache

Normalerweise werden Unterwasser-Roboter über lange Kabel von Booten oder von Land aus gesteuert. Forschern der Jacobs University in Bremen ist nun ein Durchbruch in der Mensch-Maschine-Kommunikation gelungen: Erstmals konnten sie einen Unterwasser-Roboter mit Hilfe von Gesten navigieren. Eine spezielle Kamera half dabei, die Zeichensprache in Befehle umzusetzen. Die Feldtests fanden im Rahmen des EU-geförderten Projektes CADDY „Cognitive Autonomous Diving buddy“ statt.

Archäologische Untersuchungen im Ozean und vergleichbare komplexe Forschungsprojekte unter Wasser sind auf die Unterstützung von Robotern angewiesen, um in...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>



im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics

Konzepte nutzergerechter Fahrerarbeitsplatzgestaltung

26.11.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Versammelter Sachverstand: Fachleute des Mess- und Eichwesens treffen sich in der PTB

26.11.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Fraunhofer-Kongress »Urban Futures«: 2 Tage in der Stadt der Zukunft

25.11.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Mikrobiologen enttarnen rätselhafte "Comammox"-Mikroben

26.11.2015 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

„Flüstergalerie-Moden“ in Silizium-Nanokegeln verstärken die Lumineszenz

26.11.2015 | Physik Astronomie

Digitalisierung im Seehafen der Zukunft mit Cloud als Basis für Industrie-4.0-Standards

26.11.2015 | Verkehr Logistik