Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Theory of crystal formation complete again

20.02.2013
Exactly how a crystal forms from solution is a problem that has occupied scientists for decades.

Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e), together with researchers from Germany and the USA, are now presenting the missing piece. This classical theory of crystal formation, which occurs widely in nature and in the chemical industry, was under fire for some years, but is saved now.

The team made this breakthrough by detailed study of the crystallization of the mineral calcium phosphate –the major component of our bones. The team published their findings yesterday in the online journal Nature Communications.

Crystallization is the formation of a solid ordered substance, such as happens when water freezes. In nature, crystals are mostly formed from ions which are dissolved in water, as for example in the formation of shells or bone. This involves the clustering of ions into increasingly large nuclei, until a crystal is formed when a certain size is reached. However, the details of this growth process have been the subject of discussion for many years.

According to the existing theories, it is individual ions that group together to form crystal nuclei. But in 2009 chemists led by dr. Nico Sommerdijk (TU/e) showed the presence of an intermediate step in the growth process of calcium carbonate crystals. The ions were thought to first form small clusters, which then grow into crystal nuclei. This finding, which was the cover story of Science, caused controversy because it appeared to contradict the classical crystallization theories which did not allow for such an intermediate step.

Now Sommerdijk is having second thoughts about his 2009 conclusions. At least, the answer now turns out to be more subtle than was thought at that time. Together with researchers from the Max Planck Institute in Germany and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the USA, he looked more closely at the role of these so-called pre-nucleation clusters in the growth process of the mineral calcium phosphate. Using a cryo-electron microscope, which makes images of deep-frozen samples, he was able to identify the precise components of the clusters and study the growth process in detail.

In their article in Nature Communications Sommerdijk concludes that the clusters do not form a clearly defined intermediate step, but instead are part of a gradual growth process. Sommerdijk refers to the formation of clusters as a 'false start' by the ions, because the clusters already start to organize themselves step by step while still in solution, without actually forming growth nuclei. This new understanding means the existing theories no longer need to be overturned. Sommerdijk's team now complete the theory by describing alternative 'pathways' along which crystals can form. Sommerdijk's new conclusions have since been confirmed in a second study into crystal formation in the mineral magnetite, which was published online this month in Nature Materials.

In recent years both the role and the composition of the pre-nucleation clusters were the subject of intense scientific discussions, for example last summer during the prestigious Faraday Discussions. There were also disagreements within the team itself about Sommerdijk's new interpretation. Some team members held onto the original scenario, even after numerous new experiments had confirmed that the clusters did not have the same composition and role as believed earlier. Finally it was decided to submit the article, which after four years of experimenting and revision had reached a final length of almost 100 pages, without the names of the team members who were unable to accept the new ideas.

In Sommerdijk's view the most important questions about the formation of crystals have now been answered. This theoretical knowledge is important in many fields, because of the widespread occurrence of crystallization in nature and in the chemical industry. Just a few examples are the formation of coral in the sea, the production of pharmaceuticals and the design of nanoparticles. It could for example help to make production processes less costly, faster or more energy-efficient.

The article 'Ion-association complexes unite classical and non-classical theories for the biomimetic nucleation of calcium phosphate' will be published on 19 February in Nature Communications, DOI 10.1038/ncomms2490.

The article 'Nucleation and growth of magnetite from solution', to which Nico Sommerdijk also contributed, was published online on 3 February in Nature Materials, DOI 10.1038/nmat3558.

Ivo Jongsma | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.tue.nl

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Cryo-electron microscopy achieves unprecedented resolution using new computational methods
24.03.2017 | DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

nachricht How cheetahs stay fit and healthy
24.03.2017 | Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wegweisende Erkenntnisse für die Biomedizin: NAD⁺ hilft bei Reparatur geschädigter Erbinformationen

Eine internationale Forschergruppe mit dem Bayreuther Biochemiker Prof. Dr. Clemens Steegborn präsentiert in 'Science' neue, für die Biomedizin wegweisende Forschungsergebnisse zur Rolle des Moleküls NAD⁺ bei der Korrektur von Schäden am Erbgut.

Die Zellen von Menschen und Tieren können Schäden an der DNA, dem Träger der Erbinformation, bis zu einem gewissen Umfang selbst reparieren. Diese Fähigkeit...

Im Focus: Designer-Proteine falten DNA

Florian Praetorius und Prof. Hendrik Dietz von der Technischen Universität München (TUM) haben eine neue Methode entwickelt, mit deren Hilfe sie definierte Hybrid-Strukturen aus DNA und Proteinen aufbauen können. Die Methode eröffnet Möglichkeiten für die zellbiologische Grundlagenforschung und für die Anwendung in Medizin und Biotechnologie.

Desoxyribonukleinsäure – besser bekannt unter der englischen Abkürzung DNA – ist die Trägerin unserer Erbinformation. Für Prof. Hendrik Dietz und Florian...

Im Focus: Fliegende Intensivstationen: Ultraschallgeräte in Rettungshubschraubern können Leben retten

Etwa 21 Millionen Menschen treffen jährlich in deutschen Notaufnahmen ein. Im Kampf zwischen Leben und Tod zählt für diese Patienten jede Minute. Wenn sie schon kurz nach dem Unfall zielgerichtet behandelt werden können, verbessern sich ihre Überlebenschancen erheblich. Damit Notfallmediziner in solchen Fällen schnell die richtige Diagnose stellen können, kommen in den Rettungshubschraubern der DRF Luftrettung und zunehmend auch in Notarzteinsatzfahrzeugen mobile Ultraschallgeräte zum Einsatz. Experten der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Ultraschall in der Medizin e.V. (DEGUM) schulen die Notärzte und Rettungsassistenten.

Mit mobilen Ultraschallgeräten können Notärzte beispielsweise innere Blutungen direkt am Unfallort identifizieren und sie bei Bedarf auch für Untersuchungen im...

Im Focus: Gigantische Magnetfelder im Universum

Astronomen aus Bonn und Tautenburg in Thüringen beobachteten mit dem 100-m-Radioteleskop Effelsberg Galaxienhaufen, das sind Ansammlungen von Sternsystemen, heißem Gas und geladenen Teilchen. An den Rändern dieser Galaxienhaufen fanden sie außergewöhnlich geordnete Magnetfelder, die sich über viele Millionen Lichtjahre erstrecken. Sie stellen die größten bekannten Magnetfelder im Universum dar.

Die Ergebnisse werden am 22. März in der Fachzeitschrift „Astronomy & Astrophysics“ veröffentlicht.

Galaxienhaufen sind die größten gravitativ gebundenen Strukturen im Universum, mit einer Ausdehnung von etwa zehn Millionen Lichtjahren. Im Vergleich dazu ist...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Rund 500 Fachleute aus Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft diskutierten über technologische Zukunftsthemen

24.03.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Lebenswichtige Lebensmittelchemie

23.03.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Die „Panama Papers“ aus Programmierersicht

22.03.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Rund 500 Fachleute aus Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft diskutierten über technologische Zukunftsthemen

24.03.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Förderung des Instituts für Lasertechnik und Messtechnik in Ulm mit rund 1,63 Millionen Euro

24.03.2017 | Förderungen Preise

TU-Bauingenieure koordinieren EU-Projekt zu Recycling-Beton von über sieben Millionen Euro

24.03.2017 | Förderungen Preise