Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

“Selfish” DNA in Animal Mitochondria Offers Possible Tool to Study Aging

13.08.2012
Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered, for the first time in any animal species, a type of “selfish” mitochondrial DNA that is actually hurting the organism and lessening its chance to survive – and bears a strong similarity to some damage done to human cells as they age.

The findings, just published in the journal PLoS One, are a biological oddity previously unknown in animals. But they may also provide an important new tool to study human aging, scientists said. The work was supported by the National Institutes of Health.


Courtesy of Oregon State University

For the first time researchers have found "selfish DNA" in the mitochondria of an animal, this roundworm, Caenorhabditis briggsae .

Such selfish mitochondrial DNA has been found before in plants, but not animals. In this case, the discovery was made almost by accident during some genetic research being done on a nematode, Caenorhabditis briggsae – a type of small roundworm.

“We weren’t even looking for this when we found it, at first we thought it must be a laboratory error,” said Dee Denver, an OSU associate professor of zoology. “Selfish DNA is not supposed to be found in animals. But it could turn out to be fairly important as a new genetic model to study the type of mitochondrial decay that is associated with human aging.”

DNA is the material that holds the basic genetic code for living organisms, and through complex biological processes guides beneficial cellular functions. Some of it is also found in the mitochondria, or energy-producing “powerhouse” of cells, which at one point in evolution was separate from the other DNA.

The mitochondria generally act for the benefit of the cell, even though it is somewhat separate. But the “selfish” DNA found in some plant mitochondria – and now in animals – has major differences. It tends to copy itself faster than other DNA, has no function useful to the cell, and in some cases actually harms the cell. In plants, for instance, it can affect flowering and sometimes cause sterility.

“We had seen this DNA before in this nematode and knew it was harmful, but didn’t realize it was selfish,” said Katie Clark, an OSU postdoctoral fellow. “Worms with it had less offspring than those without, they had less muscle activity. It might suggest that natural selection doesn’t work very well in this species.”

That’s part of the general quandary of selfish DNA in general, the scientists said. If it doesn’t help the organism survive and reproduce, why hasn’t it disappeared as a result of evolutionary pressure? Its persistence, they say, is an example of how natural selection doesn’t always work, either at the organism or cellular level. Biological progress is not perfect.

In this case, the population sizes of the nematode may be too small to eliminate the selfish DNA, researchers said.

What’s also interesting, they say, is that the defects this selfish DNA cause in this roundworm are surprisingly similar to the decayed mitochondrial DNA that accumulates as one aspect of human aging. More of the selfish DNA is also found in the worms as they age.

Further study of these biological differences may help shed light on what can cause the mitochondrial dysfunction, Denver said, and give researchers a new tool with which to study the aging process.

Dee Denver | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.oregonstate.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht How Invasive Plants Influence an Ecosystem
28.07.2016 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

nachricht Perseus translates proteomics data
27.07.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wie biologische Vielfalt das Ohr fit macht

Göttinger Hörforschung mit neuen Erkenntnissen: Das Ohr setzt Synapsen mit verschiedenen Eigenschaften ein, um unterschiedlich lauten Schall zu verarbeiten. Forschungsergebnisse veröffentlicht in der Fachzeitschrift „Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences“

Der menschliche Hörsinn verarbeitet einen immensen Bereich an Lautstärken. Wie schafft es das Ohr, etwa über eine Million Schalldruck-Variationen zu...

Im Focus: Ultrakompakter Photodetektor

Der Datenverkehr wächst weltweit. Glasfaserkabel transportieren die Informationen mit Lichtgeschwindigkeit über weite Entfernungen. An ihrem Ziel müssen die optischen Signale jedoch in elektrische Signale gewandelt werden, um im Computer verarbeitet zu werden. Forscher am KIT haben einen neuartigen Photodetektor entwickelt, dessen geringer Platzbedarf neue Maßstäbe setzt: Das Bauteil weist eine Grundfläche von weniger als einem Millionstel Quadratmillimeter auf, ohne die Datenübertragungsrate zu beeinträchtigen, wie sie im Fachmagazin Optica nun berichten. (DOI: 10.1364/OPTICA.3.000741)

Die neuentwickelten Photodetektoren, die weltweit kleinsten Photodetektoren für die optische Datenübertragung, eröffnen die Möglichkeit, durch integrierte...

Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

Im Focus: Neues Forschungsnetzwerk für Mikrobiomforschung

Mikroben und Viren haben weitreichenden Einfluss auf die Gesundheit von Mensch und Tier. Die neu gegründete "Austrian Microbiome Initiative" (AMICI) fördert die nationale Mikrobiomforschung und vernetzt MedizinerInnen und ForscherInnen verschiedenster Fachrichtungen zur Nutzung von Synergien.

Bakterien, Archaeen, Pilze, Viren – Milliarden von Mikroorganismen leben in Symbiose in und auf Menschen und Tieren. Diese mikroskopisch kleinen Lebewesen...

Im Focus: The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

On the monitor, a brain spins slowly and can be examined from every angle. Suddenly, some sections start glowing, first on the side and then the entire back of...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Fachkongress zu additiven Fertigungsverfahren am 14. und 15. September in Aachen

28.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Rheumatologen tagen in Frankfurt: Mehr Forschung für Rheuma gefordert

28.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

10. Internationales Hodgkin-Symposium in Köln

28.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Neue Pilot-Fertigung für thermoelektrische Module

28.07.2016 | Energie und Elektrotechnik

Flexible Kontrolle über erlernte Lautäußerungen bei Orang-Utans

28.07.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Im menschlichen Körper schlummert ein potenzieller Lebensretter

28.07.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie