Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Rot's unique wood degrading machinery to be harnessed for better biofuels production

09.02.2009
An international team led by scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) have translated the genetic code that explains the complex biochemical machinery making brown-rot fungi uniquely destructive to wood.

The same processes that provide easier access to the energy-rich sugar molecules bound up in the plant's tenacious architecture are leading to innovations for the biofuels industry. The research, conducted by more than 50 authors, is reported in the February 4 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Among the challenges to more cost-effective production of biofuels from cellulosic biomass—the fibrous material of whole plants—is to find effective means to work around the polymer lignin, the scaffolding that endows the plant's architecture with rigidity and protection from pests. By doing so, the organic compound cellulose—the long chain of glucose (sugar) units can be unbound, broken down, fermented, and distilled into liquid transportation fuel. This is where the destructive capabilities of rot come in.

"The microbial world represents a little explored yet bountiful resource for enzymes that can play a central role in the deconstruction of plant biomass—an early step in biofuel production," said Eddy Rubin, Director of the DOE JGI, where the genome sequencing was conducted. "The brown-rot Postia placenta's genome offers us a detailed inventory of the biomass-degrading enzymes that this and other fungi possess."

Rubin pointed to a complementary strategy that DOE and its Bioenergy Research Centers are pursuing of targeting a new generation of plants—perennial grasses and fast-growing trees such as poplar—bred specifically as biomass for biofuels. Among the desirable characteristics of biofuel "feedstocks" is the ease by which they can be deconstructed. Traditionally, harsh chemicals and expensive high-heat treatments have been employed. In parallel with the development of improved feedstocks is finding just the right mix of enzymes to get the most out of converting biomass into fuel.

"Nature offers some guidance here," said Dan Cullen, FPL scientist and one of the senior authors on the PNAS paper. "Postia has, over its evolution, shed the conventional enzymatic machinery for attacking plant material. Instead, the evidence suggests that it utilizes an arsenal of small oxidizing agents that blast through plant cell walls to depolymerize the cellulose. This biological process opens a door to more effective, less-energy intensive and more environmentally-sound strategies for more lignocellulose deconstruction."

Few organisms in nature can efficiently breakdown lignin into smaller, more manageable chemical units amenable to biofuels production. The exceptions are the basidiomycete fungi, which include white-rot and brown-rot—wood-decayers and essential caretakers of carbon in forest systems. In addition, brown-rot fungi have significant economic impact because their ability to wreak havoc with wooden structures. A significant portion of the U.S. timber harvest is diverted toward replacing such decayed materials.

Unlike white-rot fungi, previously characterized by DOE JGI and FPL, which simultaneously degrades lignin and cellulose, brown-rot rapidly depolymerizes the cellulose in wood without removing the lignin. Up until this study, the underlying genetics and biochemical mechanisms were poorly understood.

DNA sequence is the first step in the central dogma of molecular biology first articulated over 50 years ago by Francis Crick—the transfer of information from DNA to RNA, which in turn, is translated into protein products, such as enzymes. Postia's genome sequence was also the first step in the process that the scientific team employed to home in on the subset of data, the transcriptome, that encodes the specific enzyme activity, and the secretome, the products exported from the cell.

"For the first time we have been able to compare the genetic blue prints of brown-rot, white-rot and soft-rot fungi which play a major role in the carbon cycle of our planet," said Randy Berka, another one of the study's senior authors and Director of Integrative Biology, at Novozymes, Inc., of Davis, Calif. "Such comparisons will increase our understanding of the diverse mechanisms and chemistries involved in lignocellulose degradation. This type of information may empower industrial biotechnologists to devise new strategies to enhance efficiencies and reduce costs associated with biomass conversion for renewable fuels and chemical intermediates."

David Gilbert | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.lbl.gov
http://www.jgi.doe.gov/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Immune Defense Without Collateral Damage
23.01.2017 | Universität Basel

nachricht The interactome of infected neural cells reveals new therapeutic targets for Zika
23.01.2017 | D'Or Institute for Research and Education

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Erstmalig quantenoptischer Sensor im Weltraum getestet – mit einem Lasersystem aus Berlin

An Bord einer Höhenforschungsrakete wurde erstmals im Weltraum eine Wolke ultrakalter Atome erzeugt. Damit gelang der MAIUS-Mission der Nachweis, dass quantenoptische Sensoren auch in rauen Umgebungen wie dem Weltraum eingesetzt werden können – eine Voraussetzung, um fundamentale Fragen der Wissenschaft beantworten zu können und ein Innovationstreiber für alltägliche Anwendungen.

Gemäß dem Einstein’schen Äquivalenzprinzip werden alle Körper, unabhängig von ihren sonstigen Eigenschaften, gleich stark durch die Gravitationskraft...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Mikrobe des Jahres 2017: Halobacterium salinarum - einzellige Urform des Sehens

Am 24. Januar 1917 stach Heinrich Klebahn mit einer Nadel in den verfärbten Belag eines gesalzenen Seefischs, übertrug ihn auf festen Nährboden – und entdeckte einige Wochen später rote Kolonien eines "Salzbakteriums". Heute heißt es Halobacterium salinarum und ist genau 100 Jahre später Mikrobe des Jahres 2017, gekürt von der Vereinigung für Allgemeine und Angewandte Mikrobiologie (VAAM). Halobacterium salinarum zählt zu den Archaeen, dem Reich von Mikroben, die zwar Bakterien ähneln, aber tatsächlich enger verwandt mit Pflanzen und Tieren sind.

Rot und salzig
Archaeen sind häufig an außergewöhnliche Lebensräume angepasst, beispielsweise heiße Quellen, extrem saure Gewässer oder – wie H. salinarum – an...

Im Focus: Innovatives Hochleistungsmaterial: Biofasern aus Florfliegenseide

Neuartige Biofasern aus einem Seidenprotein der Florfliege werden am Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Polymerforschung IAP gemeinsam mit der Firma AMSilk GmbH entwickelt. Die Forscher arbeiten daran, das Protein in großen Mengen biotechnologisch herzustellen. Als hochgradig biegesteife Faser soll das Material künftig zum Beispiel in Leichtbaukunststoffen für die Verkehrstechnik eingesetzt werden. Im Bereich Medizintechnik sind beispielsweise biokompatible Seidenbeschichtungen von Implantaten denkbar. Ein erstes Materialmuster präsentiert das Fraunhofer IAP auf der Internationalen Grünen Woche in Berlin vom 20.1. bis 29.1.2017 in Halle 4.2 am Stand 212.

Zum Schutz des Nachwuchses vor bodennahen Fressfeinden lagern Florfliegen ihre Eier auf der Unterseite von Blättern ab – auf der Spitze von stabilen seidenen...

Im Focus: Verkehrsstau im Nichts

Konstanzer Physiker verbuchen neue Erfolge bei der Vermessung des Quanten-Vakuums

An der Universität Konstanz ist ein weiterer bedeutender Schritt hin zu einem völlig neuen experimentellen Zugang zur Quantenphysik gelungen. Das Team um Prof....

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Hybride Eisschutzsysteme – Lösungen für eine sichere und nachhaltige Luftfahrt

23.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Mittelstand 4.0 – Mehrwerte durch Digitalisierung: Hintergründe, Beispiele, Lösungen

20.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Nachhaltige Wassernutzung in der Landwirtschaft Osteuropas und Zentralasiens

19.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Wie der Nordatlantik zum Wärmepirat wurde

23.01.2017 | Geowissenschaften

Immunabwehr ohne Kollateralschaden

23.01.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Erstmalig quantenoptischer Sensor im Weltraum getestet – mit einem Lasersystem aus Berlin

23.01.2017 | Physik Astronomie