Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Researchers Discover a Protein that Amplifies Cell Death

16.01.2009
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have identified a small intracellular protein that helps cells commit suicide.

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have identified a small intracellular protein that helps cells commit suicide. The finding, reported as the “paper of the week” in the January 16th print issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could lead to drugs for combating cancer and other diseases characterized by overproduction of cells. The research was led by the late Dennis Shields, Ph.D., a professor in Einstein’s Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology for 30 years, who died unexpectedly in December.

In response to stress or as a natural part of aging, many cells undergo programmed suicide, also known as apoptosis. Cancer cells often become immortal and dangerous by developing the ability to suppress apoptosis.

A decade ago apoptosis was thought to be directed solely by the nucleus and mitochondria of cells. Dr. Shields’ laboratory was the first to show that a cellular organelle known as the Golgi apparatus also plays a role in apoptosis.

The Golgi package proteins and other substances made by cells and direct them to their destination within the cell. A protein called p115 is vital for maintaining the structure of the Golgi. In earlier research, Dr. Shields’ group demonstrated that the Golgi’s p115 protein splits into two pieces early in apoptosis and that the smaller of these protein fragments—205 amino acids in length—helps to maintain the cell-suicide process.

In the present study, the Einstein researchers identified the smallest region of this p115 protein fragment that is required for apoptosis: a peptide of just 26 amino acids in length that exerts its apoptotic action by traveling to the nucleus.

“Dennis Shields was one of our most outstanding scientists,” says E. Richard Stanley, Ph.D., chairman of developmental and molecular biology at Einstein. “His efforts to uncover fundamental mechanisms governing how cells work has led to new ways of thinking about apoptosis, in particular, how the Golgi regulates this process.”

The paper, by Shaeri Mukherjee and Dennis Shields, is titled “Nuclear Import is Required for the Pro-apoptotic Function of the Golgi Protein p115” and appeared in JBC Papers in Press on November 21, 2008 and in the January 16, 2009 print issue. Additionally, the journal chose the image from the paper for the cover and spotlighted the study’s first author, Shaeri Mukherjee, Ph.D., a former student in the laboratory of Dr. Shields.

About Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University
Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University is one of the nation’s premier centers for research, medical education and clinical investigation. It is the home to some 2,000 faculty members, 750 M.D. students, 350 Ph.D. students (including 125 in combined M.D./Ph.D. programs) and 380 postdoctoral investigators. Last year, Einstein received more than $130 million in support from the NIH. This includes the funding of major research centers at Einstein in diabetes, cancer, liver disease, and AIDS. Other areas where the College of Medicine is concentrating its efforts include developmental brain research, neuroscience, cardiac disease, and initiatives to reduce and eliminate ethnic and racial health disparities. Through its extensive affiliation network involving five hospital centers in the Bronx, Manhattan and Long Island – which includes Montefiore Medical Center, Einstein’s officially designated University Hospital – the College runs one of the largest post-graduate medical training program in the United States, offering approximately 150 residency programs to more than 2,500 physicians in training.

Michael Heller | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.aecom.yu.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Severity of enzyme deficiency central to favism
26.07.2016 | Universität Zürich

nachricht From vision to hand action
26.07.2016 | Deutsches Primatenzentrum GmbH - Leibniz-Institut für Primatenforschung

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

Im Focus: Neues Forschungsnetzwerk für Mikrobiomforschung

Mikroben und Viren haben weitreichenden Einfluss auf die Gesundheit von Mensch und Tier. Die neu gegründete "Austrian Microbiome Initiative" (AMICI) fördert die nationale Mikrobiomforschung und vernetzt MedizinerInnen und ForscherInnen verschiedenster Fachrichtungen zur Nutzung von Synergien.

Bakterien, Archaeen, Pilze, Viren – Milliarden von Mikroorganismen leben in Symbiose in und auf Menschen und Tieren. Diese mikroskopisch kleinen Lebewesen...

Im Focus: The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

On the monitor, a brain spins slowly and can be examined from every angle. Suddenly, some sections start glowing, first on the side and then the entire back of...

Im Focus: Superschneller Internetfunk dank Terahertz-Strahlung

Wissenschaftler aus Dresden und Dublin haben einen vielversprechenden technologischen Ansatz gefunden, der Notebooks und anderen mobilen Computern in Zukunft deutlich schnellere Internet-Funkzugänge ermöglichen könnte als bisher. Die Teams am Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) und am irischen Trinity College Dublin brachten hauchdünne Schichten aus einer speziellen Verbindung von Mangan und Gallium dazu, sehr effizient Strahlung im sogenannten Terahertz-Frequenzbereich auszusenden. Als Sender in WLAN-Funknetzen eingesetzt, könnten die höheren Frequenzen die Datenraten zukünftiger Kommunikations-Netzwerke spürbar erhöhen.

„Wir halten diesen Ansatz für technologisch sehr interessant“, betont Dr. Michael Gensch, Leiter einer Arbeitsgruppe am HZDR, die sich mit den...

Im Focus: Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

While studying purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, researchers discovered an unconventional charge density wave on its surface.

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

8. Forum Energie

26.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Kongress für Molekulare Medizin: Krankheiten interdisziplinär verstehen und behandeln

20.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Ultraschnelle Kalorimetrie: Gesellschaft für thermische Analyse GEFTA lädt zur Jahrestagung

19.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Vernetzt und intuitiv: HEIDENHAIN-Steuerungen in der digitalen Fertigung

26.07.2016 | Messenachrichten

mayr® Antriebstechnik auf der Wind Energy 2016

26.07.2016 | Messenachrichten

Miniaturisiertes Infrarot-Thermometer für Kunststoff-Folien

26.07.2016 | Messenachrichten