Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Malaria parasite's masquerade ball could come to an end

03.12.2012
Hebrew University researchers discover how the deadly malaria parasite evades the immune system, and make significant progress toward developing a cure

More than a million people die each year of malaria caused by different strains of the Plasmodium parasite transmitted by the Anopheles mosquito. The medical world has yet to find an effective vaccine against the deadly parasite, which mainly affects pregnant women and children under the age of five.


Anopheles mosquito (Photo: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

By figuring out how the most dangerous strain evades the watchful eye of the immune system, researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have now paved the way for the development of new approaches to cure this acute infection.

Upon entering the bloodstream, the Plasmodium parasite reproduces in the red blood cells and transports its proteins to their surface. These cells become sticky and cling to the walls of blood vessels, blocking them and damaging the human body. The immune system typically identifies these proteins as foreign and creates antibodies to fight the disease.

The deadliest of the five Plasmodium strains is Plasmodium falciparum, which causes more than 90% of deaths associated with malaria. This sophisticated strain deceives the immune system by revealing only one protein encoded by one of the sixty genes at its disposal. While the immune system is busy fighting that protein, the parasite switches to another protein not recognized by the immune system, thus avoiding the antibody response and re-establishing infection.

In research conducted at the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, and the Kuvin Center for the Study of Infectious and Tropical Diseases at the Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Dr. Ron Dzikowski and research student Inbar Avraham revealed for the first time the genetic mechanism that enables a parasite to selectively express one protein while hiding other proteins from the immune system.

By combining bioinformatic and genetic methods, the researchers identified a unique DNA sequence found in the regulatory regions of the gene family that encode for these surface proteins. They showed that the parasite's ability to express only one gene while hiding the other 59 depends on this sequence. The research suggests that by interfering with the regulatory role of this DNA sequence it would be possible to prevent Plasmodium falciparum from hiding most of its destructive genes from the immune system.

According to Dr. Dzikowski, "These results are a major breakthrough in understanding the parasite's ability to cause damage. This understanding could lead to strategies for disrupting this ability and giving the immune system an opportunity to clear the infection and overcome the disease. This clever parasite knows how to switch masks to evade an immune attack, but our discovery could lead to new ways to prevent it from continuing this dangerous game."

The research, "Insulator-like pairing elements regulate silencing and mutually exclusive expression in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum," was published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It was funded by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the Einstein Kaye Fellowships, which supports outstanding research students.

For information, contact:

Dov Smith, Hebrew University Foreign Press Liaison
02-5881641 / 054-8820860 (+972-54-8820860)
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
Orit Sulitzeanu, Hebrew University Spokesperson
02-5882910 / 054-8820016
orits@savion.huji.ac.il

Dov Smith | Hebrew University
Further information:
http://www.huji.ac.il

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Asian dust providing key nutrients for California's giant sequoias
28.03.2017 | University of California - Riverside

nachricht Chlamydia: How bacteria take over control
28.03.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Entwicklung miniaturisierter Lichtmikroskope - „ChipScope“ will ins Innere lebender Zellen blicken

Das Institut für Halbleitertechnik und das Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, beide Mitglieder des Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), der Technischen Universität Braunschweig, sind Partner des kürzlich gestarteten EU-Forschungsprojektes ChipScope. Ziel ist es, ein neues, extrem kleines Lichtmikroskop zu entwickeln. Damit soll das Innere lebender Zellen in Echtzeit beobachtet werden können. Sieben Institute in fünf europäischen Ländern beteiligen sich über die nächsten vier Jahre an diesem technologisch anspruchsvollen Projekt.

Die zukünftigen Einsatzmöglichkeiten des neu zu entwickelnden und nur wenige Millimeter großen Mikroskops sind äußerst vielfältig. Die Projektpartner haben...

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Das anwachsende Ende der Ordnung

Physiker aus Konstanz weisen sogenannte Mermin-Wagner-Fluktuationen experimentell nach

Ein Kristall besteht aus perfekt angeordneten Teilchen, aus einer lückenlos symmetrischen Atomstruktur – dies besagt die klassische Definition aus der Physik....

Im Focus: Wegweisende Erkenntnisse für die Biomedizin: NAD⁺ hilft bei Reparatur geschädigter Erbinformationen

Eine internationale Forschergruppe mit dem Bayreuther Biochemiker Prof. Dr. Clemens Steegborn präsentiert in 'Science' neue, für die Biomedizin wegweisende Forschungsergebnisse zur Rolle des Moleküls NAD⁺ bei der Korrektur von Schäden am Erbgut.

Die Zellen von Menschen und Tieren können Schäden an der DNA, dem Träger der Erbinformation, bis zu einem gewissen Umfang selbst reparieren. Diese Fähigkeit...

Im Focus: Designer-Proteine falten DNA

Florian Praetorius und Prof. Hendrik Dietz von der Technischen Universität München (TUM) haben eine neue Methode entwickelt, mit deren Hilfe sie definierte Hybrid-Strukturen aus DNA und Proteinen aufbauen können. Die Methode eröffnet Möglichkeiten für die zellbiologische Grundlagenforschung und für die Anwendung in Medizin und Biotechnologie.

Desoxyribonukleinsäure – besser bekannt unter der englischen Abkürzung DNA – ist die Trägerin unserer Erbinformation. Für Prof. Hendrik Dietz und Florian...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Neue Methoden für zuverlässige Mikroelektronik: Internationale Experten treffen sich in Halle

28.03.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Wie Menschen wachsen

27.03.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Zweites Symposium 4SMARTS zeigt Potenziale aktiver, intelligenter und adaptiver Systeme

27.03.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Warum der Brennstoffzelle die Luft wegbleibt

28.03.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Chlamydien: Wie Bakterien das Ruder übernehmen

28.03.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Sterngeburt in den Winden supermassereicher Schwarzer Löcher

28.03.2017 | Physik Astronomie