Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Long Noncoding RNAs Control Development of Fat Cells

15.02.2013
Whitehead Institute researchers have identified a previously unrecognized layer of genetic regulation that is necessary for the generation of undesirable white fat cells. When this regulation is disrupted, white fat cells are unable to accumulate lipid droplets or mature from their precursors.

“We’re trying to figure out what the mechanism is—what it takes to make fat cells,” says Whitehead Founding Member Harvey Lodish, who is also a professor of biology and a professor of bioengineering at MIT. “The obvious reason we’re interested in this is because a lot of people have too many of them.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, obesity—having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher—is a serious healthcare and economic problem in the United States. More than one-third of American adults are obese, a condition that can lead to heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and stroke. In 2008 obesity-related issues were estimated to cost $147 billion.

All of these problems are caused by an overabundance of white fat cells—adipose tissue cells that store excess energy as fat or lipid droplets. Unlike white fat cells, brown fat cells, which are most prevalent in babies and have a reduced presence in adults, use lipids as fuel to maintain a stable, warm body temperature. Understanding how both types of fat cells are formed and maintained may one day lead to anti-obesity therapies.

In the quest to understand fat-cell generation and maintenance, the Lodish lab scanned mouse fat cells to determine which of the cells’ long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are active. Of the 175 identified, 10 lncRNAs were found to play significant roles in these cells.

Residing within what was once dubbed “junk DNA”, lncRNAs have recently gained fame as important gene expression regulators that modify chromatin, enhance transcription, and promote messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation, as well as through other methods that have yet to be elucidated. Recently, the Lodish lab identified lncRNAs as playing a vital role in regulating programmed cell death during one of the final stages of red blood cell differentiation.

To determine the function of the identified active lncRNAs in fat cells, Lei Sun, a former postdoctoral researcher in the Lodish lab, and Loyal Goff from Harvard University and the Broad Institute, knocked each lncRNA down individually in fat precursor cells and analyzed the results. When 10 of these lncRNAs had reduced expression, the cells did not turn on the genes that are usually expressed in mature white fat cells, and the cells had significantly smaller lipid droplets than white fat cells with normal lncRNA expression. Their work is reported in this week’s issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

“This is the first study showing the importance of lncRNAs for the regulation of adipogeneis,” says Sun, who is now an assistant professor at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School. “Our understanding of lncRNA function in these cells is still incomplete, but in the future, this line of research may reveal new pathways that obesity drugs could target.”

This research was supported by National Institutes of Health (DK047618, DK068348, 5P01HL066105, and 1DP2OD00667), National Science Foundation, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, Agency of Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, Searle Scholars Program, Smith Family Awards Program, and Merkin Family Foundation.

Written by Nicole Giese Rura

Harvey Lodish’s primary affiliation is with Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, where his laboratory is located and all his research is conducted. He is also a professor of biology and a professor of bioengineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Full Citation:

“Long noncoding RNAs regulate adipogenesis”

PNAS, online the week of February 11, 2013.

Lei Sun (a,1), Loyal A. Goff (b,c,d,1), Cole Trapnell (b,c,1), Ryan Alexander (a,d), Kinyui Alice Lo (a,d), Ezgi Hacisuleyman (b,e), Martin Sauvageau (b,c,e), Barbara Tazon-Vega (b,c), David R. Kelley (b,c), David G. Hendrickson (b,c), Bingbing Yuan (a), Manolis Kellis (c,d), Harvey F. Lodish (a,f,g), and John L. Rinn (b,c,e).

a. Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142
b. Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138
c. The Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142
d. Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139
e. Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138
f. Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139
g. Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139

1. These authors contributed equally to this work.

Nicole Giese Rura | Newswise
Further information:
http://www.wi.mit.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht The interactome of infected neural cells reveals new therapeutic targets for Zika
23.01.2017 | D'Or Institute for Research and Education

nachricht Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery
20.01.2017 | GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Erstmalig quantenoptischer Sensor im Weltraum getestet – mit einem Lasersystem aus Berlin

An Bord einer Höhenforschungsrakete wurde erstmals im Weltraum eine Wolke ultrakalter Atome erzeugt. Damit gelang der MAIUS-Mission der Nachweis, dass quantenoptische Sensoren auch in rauen Umgebungen wie dem Weltraum eingesetzt werden können – eine Voraussetzung, um fundamentale Fragen der Wissenschaft beantworten zu können und ein Innovationstreiber für alltägliche Anwendungen.

Gemäß dem Einstein’schen Äquivalenzprinzip werden alle Körper, unabhängig von ihren sonstigen Eigenschaften, gleich stark durch die Gravitationskraft...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Mikrobe des Jahres 2017: Halobacterium salinarum - einzellige Urform des Sehens

Am 24. Januar 1917 stach Heinrich Klebahn mit einer Nadel in den verfärbten Belag eines gesalzenen Seefischs, übertrug ihn auf festen Nährboden – und entdeckte einige Wochen später rote Kolonien eines "Salzbakteriums". Heute heißt es Halobacterium salinarum und ist genau 100 Jahre später Mikrobe des Jahres 2017, gekürt von der Vereinigung für Allgemeine und Angewandte Mikrobiologie (VAAM). Halobacterium salinarum zählt zu den Archaeen, dem Reich von Mikroben, die zwar Bakterien ähneln, aber tatsächlich enger verwandt mit Pflanzen und Tieren sind.

Rot und salzig
Archaeen sind häufig an außergewöhnliche Lebensräume angepasst, beispielsweise heiße Quellen, extrem saure Gewässer oder – wie H. salinarum – an...

Im Focus: Innovatives Hochleistungsmaterial: Biofasern aus Florfliegenseide

Neuartige Biofasern aus einem Seidenprotein der Florfliege werden am Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Polymerforschung IAP gemeinsam mit der Firma AMSilk GmbH entwickelt. Die Forscher arbeiten daran, das Protein in großen Mengen biotechnologisch herzustellen. Als hochgradig biegesteife Faser soll das Material künftig zum Beispiel in Leichtbaukunststoffen für die Verkehrstechnik eingesetzt werden. Im Bereich Medizintechnik sind beispielsweise biokompatible Seidenbeschichtungen von Implantaten denkbar. Ein erstes Materialmuster präsentiert das Fraunhofer IAP auf der Internationalen Grünen Woche in Berlin vom 20.1. bis 29.1.2017 in Halle 4.2 am Stand 212.

Zum Schutz des Nachwuchses vor bodennahen Fressfeinden lagern Florfliegen ihre Eier auf der Unterseite von Blättern ab – auf der Spitze von stabilen seidenen...

Im Focus: Verkehrsstau im Nichts

Konstanzer Physiker verbuchen neue Erfolge bei der Vermessung des Quanten-Vakuums

An der Universität Konstanz ist ein weiterer bedeutender Schritt hin zu einem völlig neuen experimentellen Zugang zur Quantenphysik gelungen. Das Team um Prof....

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Hybride Eisschutzsysteme – Lösungen für eine sichere und nachhaltige Luftfahrt

23.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Mittelstand 4.0 – Mehrwerte durch Digitalisierung: Hintergründe, Beispiele, Lösungen

20.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Nachhaltige Wassernutzung in der Landwirtschaft Osteuropas und Zentralasiens

19.01.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Erstmalig quantenoptischer Sensor im Weltraum getestet – mit einem Lasersystem aus Berlin

23.01.2017 | Physik Astronomie

Vom Feld in die Schule: Aktuelle Forschung zu moderner Landwirtschaft für den Unterricht

23.01.2017 | Bildung Wissenschaft

Hybride Eisschutzsysteme – Lösungen für eine sichere und nachhaltige Luftfahrt

23.01.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten