Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

IOW discovers and cultivates two previously unknown unicellular species from the Baltic Sea

29.01.2013
IOW researchers, in collaboration with their Russian colleagues, are the first to have successfully cultivated unicellular collared flagellates from oxygen-depleted areas of the ocean.

The two previously unknown species from the Baltic Sea appear to have adapted extremely well to the changing oxygen conditions of their native environment and have a cell structure that heretofore has not been observed in collared flagellates.

The funnel-shaped collar accounts for the scientific name of these protozoa, choanoflagellates (choano [Greek]: depression, funnel). They are among the protists and bacterial feeders that play a major role in the microbial food web. The collar consists of a series of filamentous cellular appendages, the microvilli. Protruding from the collar is a single flagellum, which these one-celled organisms use both to propel themselves and to swirl their bacterial food, which is then captured by the funnel and, via the microvilli, transported into the cell.

Cultivation — that is, the establishment of pure cultures under laboratory conditions — is extremely difficult and only rarely successful for these types of microorganisms. Consequently, only a small proportion of the existing marine microbial biodiversity is known. Previous research carried out by members of the IOW indicated that choanoflagellates in the oxygen-depleted areas of the central Baltic Sea are present in elevated concentrations. However, until now it has not been possible to obtain pure laboratory cultures of choanoflagellates isolated from marine low-oxygen environments (redox zones).

Exactly this feat was recently accomplished by IOW researchers with the support of Russian visiting scientists. The addition of Codosiga minima and Codosiga balthica, two previously completely unknown species of collared flagellates, further enriches the extensive culture collection of the IOW, which already includes representatives of a number of bacterial, flagellate, and ciliate species central to the Baltic Sea ecosystem. These two new members have been examined by electron microscopy and characterized in detail. Codosiga minima was so named because of its small size (about 3 microns) and it is probably one of the rarer species in the Baltic Sea. Its "big brother" (about 5 microns), however, is a common species that seems to preferentially reside in the Baltic Sea, hence the name Codosiga balthica.

Both species make use of the food sources of the low-oxygen redox zone and feed on its abundant supplies of bacteria and archaea. At the same time they enjoy a degree of protection from predators, since multicellular zooplankton (e.g., small crustaceans) rarely ventures into the low-oxygen layers. In order to take advantage of the living conditions of the redox zone, the two choanoflagellates — which evolved from oxygen-loving ancestors — have adapted in many ways to the lack of oxygen. Thus, the normally oxygen-dependent mitochondria — the energy-producing "power plants" of cells — have undergone an important change in that they can function with little or even no oxygen. This form of adaptation is absolutely unique among the collared flagellates as it has never been observed before in this group of organisms. Another surprise for the IOW researchers was that Codosiga balthica harbors intracellular bacteria. Thus, numerous bacterial cells live within each flagellated cell, where they presumably serve to support energy metabolism.

These two closely related species are now available for the first time as model organisms, which will allow experimental investigations of choanoflagellate metabolism under low-oxygen conditions. The results of such studies will no doubt help to clarify many of the as yet unanswered ecological, physiological, and evolutionary questions regarding collared flagellates.

The described work was supported by the German Research Foundation conducted. Further information on these results can be found in:

Wylezich,C., Karpov,S.A., Mylnikov,A.P., Anderson,R. and Jürgens,K. (2012) Ecologically relevant choanoflagellates collected from hypoxic water masses of the Baltic Sea have untypical mitochondrial cristae. BMC Microbiol. 12 (1), 271

Contact:

Dr. Claudia Wylezich, Biological Oceanography, IOW
(Tel.: 0381 / 5197 3434, Email: claudia.wylezich@io-warnemuende.de)
Dr. Barbara Hentzsch, Public Relation, IOW
(Tel.: 0381 / 5197 102, Email: barbara.hentzsch@io-warnemuende.de)
Nils Ehrenberg, Public Relation, IOW
(Tel.: 0381 / 5197 106, Email: nils.ehrenberg@io-warnemuende.de)
The IOW is a member of the Leibniz Association, which currently includes 86 research institutes and a scientific infrastructure for research. The Leibniz Institutes' fields range from the natural sciences, engineering and environmental sciences, business, social sciences and space sciences to the humanities. Federal and state governments together support the Institute. In total, the Leibniz Institute has 16 800 employees, of which approximately are 7,800 scientists, and of those 3300 young scientists. The total budget of the Institute is more than 1.4 billion Euros. Third-party funds amount to approximately € 330 million per year.

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch | idw
Further information:
http://www.leibniz-gemeinschaft.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Complementing conventional antibiotics
24.05.2018 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

nachricht Building a brain, cell by cell: Researchers make a mini neuron network (of two)
23.05.2018 | Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Mit Hilfe molekularer Schalter lassen sich künftig neuartige Bauelemente entwickeln

Einem Forscherteam unter Führung von Physikern der Technischen Universität München (TUM) ist es gelungen, spezielle Moleküle mit einer angelegten Spannung zwischen zwei strukturell unterschiedlichen Zuständen hin und her zu schalten. Derartige Nano-Schalter könnten Basis für neuartige Bauelemente sein, die auf Silizium basierende Komponenten durch organische Moleküle ersetzen.

Die Entwicklung neuer elektronischer Technologien fordert eine ständige Verkleinerung funktioneller Komponenten. Physikern der TU München ist es im Rahmen...

Im Focus: Molecular switch will facilitate the development of pioneering electro-optical devices

A research team led by physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed molecular nanoswitches that can be toggled between two structurally different states using an applied voltage. They can serve as the basis for a pioneering class of devices that could replace silicon-based components with organic molecules.

The development of new electronic technologies drives the incessant reduction of functional component sizes. In the context of an international collaborative...

Im Focus: GRACE Follow-On erfolgreich gestartet: Das Satelliten-Tandem dokumentiert den globalen Wandel

Die Satellitenmission GRACE-FO ist gestartet. Am 22. Mai um 21.47 Uhr (MESZ) hoben die beiden Satelliten des GFZ und der NASA an Bord einer Falcon-9-Rakete von der Vandenberg Air Force Base (Kalifornien) ab und wurden in eine polare Umlaufbahn gebracht. Dort nehmen sie in den kommenden Monaten ihre endgültige Position ein. Die NASA meldete 30 Minuten später, dass der Kontakt zu den Satelliten in ihrem Zielorbit erfolgreich hergestellt wurde. GRACE Follow-On wird das Erdschwerefeld und dessen räumliche und zeitliche Variationen sehr genau vermessen. Sie ermöglicht damit präzise Aussagen zum globalen Wandel, insbesondere zu Änderungen im Wasserhaushalt, etwa dem Verlust von Eismassen.

Potsdam, 22. Mai 2018: Die deutsch-amerikanische Satellitenmission GRACE-FO (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment Follow On) ist erfolgreich gestartet. Am...

Im Focus: Faserlaser mit einstellbarer Wellenlänge

Faserlaser sind ein effizientes und robustes Werkzeug zum Schweißen und Schneiden von Metallen beispielsweise in der Automobilindustrie. Systeme bei denen die Wellenlänge des Laserlichts flexibel einstellbar ist, sind für spektroskopische Anwendungen und die Medizintechnik interessant. Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler des Leibniz-Instituts für Photonische Technologien (Leibniz-IPHT) haben, im Rahmen des vom Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) geförderten Projekts „FlexTune“, ein neues Abstimmkonzept realisiert, das erstmals verschiedene Emissionswellenlängen voneinander unabhängig und zeitlich synchron erzeugt.

Faserlaser bieten im Vergleich zu herkömmlichen Lasern eine höhere Strahlqualität und Energieeffizienz. Integriert in einen vollständig faserbasierten...

Im Focus: LZH zeigt Lasermaterialbearbeitung von morgen auf der LASYS 2018

Auf der LASYS 2018 zeigt das Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) vom 5. bis zum 7. Juni Prozesse für die Lasermaterialbearbeitung von morgen in Halle 4 an Stand 4E75. Mit gesprengten Bombenhüllen präsentiert das LZH in Stuttgart zudem erste Ergebnisse aus einem Forschungsprojekt zur zivilen Sicherheit.

Auf der diesjährigen LASYS stellt das LZH lichtbasierte Prozesse wie Schneiden, Schweißen, Abtragen und Strukturieren sowie die additive Fertigung für Metalle,...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Größter Astronomie-Kongress kommt nach Wien

24.05.2018 | Veranstaltungen

22. Business Forum Qualität: Vom Smart Device bis zum Digital Twin

22.05.2018 | Veranstaltungen

48V im Fokus!

21.05.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Was einen guten Katalysator ausmacht

24.05.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Superkondensatoren aus Holzbestandteilen

24.05.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Neue Schaltschrank-Plattform für die Energiewelt

24.05.2018 | Messenachrichten

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics