Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Indian plant could play key role in death of cancer cells

14.02.2013
Scientists at the Georgia Regents University Cancer Center have identified an Indian plant, used for centuries to treat inflammation, fever and malaria, that could help kill cancer cells.

Cancer cells typically avoid death by hijacking molecular chaperones that guide and protect the proteins that ensure normal cellular function and then tricking them into helping mutated versions of those proteins stay alive, says Dr. Ahmed Chadli, a researcher in the Molecular Chaperone Program at the GRU Cancer Center and senior author of the study named the Journal of Biological Chemistry's Paper of the Week.

Drug development has focused on the chaperone Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90) because it plays a key role in assisting mutated proteins, making it an attractive cancer drug target. However, the clinical efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors has been disappointing. Most current small molecules targeting Hsp90 have inadvertently resulted in the expression of proteins that protect cancer cells from programmed cell death and compromise the Hsp90 inhibitors in the clinic.

In this study, however, Chaitanya Patwardhan, a graduate student in Dr. Chadli's lab, found that gedunin, an Indian plant compound, attacks a co-chaperone, or helper protein, of Hsp90 called p23.

"This compound binds directly to p23, leading to inactivation of the Hsp90 machine—without production of anti-apoptotic proteins—thus killing cancer cells," said Dr. Chadli. "The idea here is that this will open a door for new ways of targeting Hsp90 by targeting its helper proteins, which may be used in combination with established Hsp90 inhibitors that are ongoing clinical trials. In the future, this research could have applications in drug development for hormone-dependent cancers, including breast, prostate and endometrial cancers."

"One of the major areas of scientific emphasis of the GRU Cancer Center is to develop therapeutic approaches to cancer targeting specific molecules within the cancer cell, including chaperones," said Dr. Samir N. Khleif, Director of the GRU Cancer Center. "This finding is an important piece of the puzzle, bringing us closer to our goal of helping patients with cancer."

Along with Patwardhan, the study was also authored by Dr. Abdul Fauq, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine; Laura B. Peterson and Dr. Brian S.J. Blagg, both of the University of Kansas; and Dr. Charles Miller, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

Dr. Chadli's lab is also the recipient of a National Institutes of Health R01 grant to look for new molecules targeting the Hsp90 machine.

Only the top 2 percent of the 6,600 manuscripts annually reviewed in terms of significance and overall importance, by the JBC are ranked as Papers of the Week. The study will also be the focus of an upcoming JBC podcast.

Danielle Moores | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.georgiahealth.edu/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Ageless ears? Elderly barn owls do not become hard of hearing
26.09.2017 | Carl von Ossietzky-Universität Oldenburg

nachricht eTRANSAFE – collaborative research project aimed at improving safety in drug development process
26.09.2017 | Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Die schnellste lichtgetriebene Stromquelle der Welt

Die Stromregelung ist eine der wichtigsten Komponenten moderner Elektronik, denn über schnell angesteuerte Elektronenströme werden Daten und Signale übertragen. Die Ansprüche an die Schnelligkeit der Datenübertragung wachsen dabei beständig. In eine ganz neue Dimension der schnellen Stromregelung sind nun Wissenschaftler der Lehrstühle für Laserphysik und Angewandte Physik an der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) vorgedrungen. Ihnen ist es gelungen, im „Wundermaterial“ Graphen Elektronenströme innerhalb von einer Femtosekunde in die gewünschte Richtung zu lenken – eine Femtosekunde entspricht dabei dem millionsten Teil einer milliardstel Sekunde.

Der Trick: die Elektronen werden von einer einzigen Schwingung eines Lichtpulses angetrieben. Damit können sie den Vorgang um mehr als das Tausendfache im...

Im Focus: The fastest light-driven current source

Controlling electronic current is essential to modern electronics, as data and signals are transferred by streams of electrons which are controlled at high speed. Demands on transmission speeds are also increasing as technology develops. Scientists from the Chair of Laser Physics and the Chair of Applied Physics at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have succeeded in switching on a current with a desired direction in graphene using a single laser pulse within a femtosecond ¬¬ – a femtosecond corresponds to the millionth part of a billionth of a second. This is more than a thousand times faster compared to the most efficient transistors today.

Graphene is up to the job

Im Focus: LaserTAB: Effizientere und präzisere Kontakte dank Roboter-Kollaboration

Auf der diesjährigen productronica in München stellt das Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT das Laser-Based Tape-Automated Bonding, kurz LaserTAB, vor: Die Aachener Experten zeigen, wie sich dank neuer Optik und Roboter-Unterstützung Batteriezellen und Leistungselektronik effizienter und präziser als bisher lasermikroschweißen lassen.

Auf eine geschickte Kombination von Roboter-Einsatz, Laserscanner mit selbstentwickelter neuer Optik und Prozessüberwachung setzt das Fraunhofer ILT aus Aachen.

Im Focus: LaserTAB: More efficient and precise contacts thanks to human-robot collaboration

At the productronica trade fair in Munich this November, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be presenting Laser-Based Tape-Automated Bonding, LaserTAB for short. The experts from Aachen will be demonstrating how new battery cells and power electronics can be micro-welded more efficiently and precisely than ever before thanks to new optics and robot support.

Fraunhofer ILT from Aachen relies on a clever combination of robotics and a laser scanner with new optics as well as process monitoring, which it has developed...

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Im Spannungsfeld von Biologie und Modellierung

26.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Archaeopteryx, Klimawandel und Zugvögel: Deutsche Ornithologen-Gesellschaft tagt an der Uni Halle

26.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Unsere Arbeitswelt von morgen – Polarisierendes Thema beim 7. Unternehmertag der HNEE

26.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Mit künstlicher Intelligenz zum chemischen Fingerabdruck

26.09.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Eine detaillierte Waldkarte des blauen Planeten

26.09.2017 | Geowissenschaften

RWI/ISL-Containerumschlag-Index steigt weiter

26.09.2017 | Wirtschaft Finanzen