Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Fat cells become useful stem cells in tissue reconstruction

23.12.2010
Two studies appearing in the current issue of Cell Transplantation 19(10) discuss stem cells derived from adipose (fat) cells and their potential use in plastic surgery and tissue reconstruction. The studies are now freely available on-line at http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/ .

Adipose-derived stem cells maintain their "stemness" and could be useful for cell-based therapies A team of researchers from several institutions in Italy isolated and characterized adult fat cell-derived stem cells from patients undergoing lipoaspiration (surgical removal of fat deposits) in order to investigate the ability of the fat cells to maintain their stem cell characteristics in in vitro cultures to the point where once transplanted they could aid in tissue regeneration.

According to the study's corresponding authors Dr. Stefami Bucher of the San Gallicano Institute (Rome) and Dr. Rita Falcioni of the Regina Elena Cancer Institute (Rome), adipose tissues share several biological properties with bone marrow, they can be found in abundance, they can be obtained from patients undergoing noninvasive lipoaspirate procedures, and they have the potential to be useful in a range of therapeutic applications.

"The use of lipoaspirate as filling material is a powerful technique for tissue repair in plastic surgery," said Dr. Falcioni. "Increasingly, it is used in oncology to repair tissue damaged by surgical treatments, such as mastectomy. The use of purified adipose-derived stem cells might improve this surgical procedure by shortening the time to achieve esthetic results and thereby improving patient quality of life."

The researchers described adipose tissues as "highly specialized connective tissues" that help provide the body with an energy source, yet little research has investigated the transplant potential of adipose-derived stem cells.

"We strongly suggest that the adipose-derived stem cells we purified in our study could be applied in the near future for cell therapy using the cell-assisted lipotransfer technique."

Contact: Dr. Rita Falcioni, Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Department of Experimental Oncology, Molecular Oncogenesis Laboratory, Via delle Messi d'Oro, 156, 00158 Rome, Italy Tel:+ 39-06- 52662535; Fax: +39-06-52662505 Email: falcioni@ifo.it

Citation: Folgiero, V.; Migliano, E.; Tedesco, M.; Iacovelli, S.; Bon, G.; Torre, M. L.; Sacchi, A.; Marazzi, M.; Bucher, S.; Falcioni, R. Purification and characterization of adipose-derived stem cells from patients with lipoaspirate transplant. Cell Transplant. 19(10):1225-1235; 2010.

Plastic surgery meets regenerative medicine

"Progenitor, endothelial and mensenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissues could be central to plastic and reconstructive surgery applications as well as represent the focus for therapies for a number of disease conditions, including those affecting bone, cartilage, muscle, liver, kidney, cardiac, neural and pancreatic tissue," said Dr. Camillo Ricordi, lead author on a paper by researchers from the University of Miami's Cell Transplant Center and Diabetes Research Institute.

According to Dr. Ricordi and colleagues, successful engraftment and long term survival of transplanted adipose tissue has increased interest in structural fat grafting, yet there is a high percentage (up to 70%) of tissue resorption over time. Adipose cells can also fall victim to trauma during harvesting. In contrast, progenitor cells have minimal metabolic requirements and tend to survive longer.

"Adipose-derived stem cells might very well represent the only tissue surviving transplantation," concluded Dr. Ricordi. "There is much more to be learned in tissue remodeling following adipose tissue transplantation and it is time to carefully re-examine the potential implications of autologous fat grafting as being more than the filler concept for which it was originally utilized."

"These two articles highlight the considerable promise for therapeutic and cosmetic benefit from the relatively new derivation of stem cells from fat cells," said Dr. Paul Sanberg, co-editor-in-chief of the journal Cell Transplantation and executive director of the University of South Florida Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair. "It will be of great interest to see how the clinical use of these cells will develop."

Contact: Dr. Camillo Ricordi, Cell Transplant Center and Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami, 1450 NW 10th Ave., Miami, FL, USA 33136, Tel:+ 305-243-4404; Fax: 305-243-6913 Email: ricordi@miami.edu

Citation: Tremolada, C.; Palmieri, G.; Ricordi, C. Adipocyte Transplantation and Stem Cells: Plastic Surgery Meets Regenerative Medicine. Cell Transplant. 19(10):1217-1223; 2010.

The editorial offices for Cell Transplantation are at the Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, College of Medicine, the University of South Florida and the Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Contact, David Eve, PhD. at celltransplantation@gmail.com or Camillo Ricordi, MD at ricordi@miami.edu

News Release by Randolph Fillmore, Florida Science Communications, Inc. www.sciencescribe.net

David Eve | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.miami.edu
http://www.sciencescribe.net

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity
22.09.2017 | DFG-Forschungszentrum für Regenerative Therapien TU Dresden

nachricht The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet
22.09.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Hochpräzise Verschaltung in der Hirnrinde

Es ist noch immer weitgehend unbekannt, wie die komplexen neuronalen Netzwerke im Gehirn aufgebaut sind. Insbesondere in der Hirnrinde der Säugetiere, wo Sehen, Denken und Orientierung berechnet werden, sind die Regeln, nach denen die Nervenzellen miteinander verschaltet sind, nur unzureichend erforscht. Wissenschaftler um Moritz Helmstaedter vom Max-Planck-Institut für Hirnforschung in Frankfurt am Main und Helene Schmidt vom Bernstein-Zentrum der Humboldt-Universität in Berlin haben nun in dem Teil der Großhirnrinde, der für die räumliche Orientierung zuständig ist, ein überraschend präzises Verschaltungsmuster der Nervenzellen entdeckt.

Wie die Forscher in Nature berichten (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005), haben die...

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Wundermaterial Graphen: Gewölbt wie das Polster eines Chesterfield-Sofas

Graphen besitzt extreme Eigenschaften und ist vielseitig verwendbar. Mit einem Trick lassen sich sogar die Spins im Graphen kontrollieren. Dies gelang einem HZB-Team schon vor einiger Zeit: Die Physiker haben dafür eine Lage Graphen auf einem Nickelsubstrat aufgebracht und Goldatome dazwischen eingeschleust. Im Fachblatt 2D Materials zeigen sie nun, warum dies sich derartig stark auf die Spins auswirkt. Graphen kommt so auch als Material für künftige Informationstechnologien infrage, die auf der Verarbeitung von Spins als Informationseinheiten basieren.

Graphen ist wohl die exotischste Form von Kohlenstoff: Alle Atome sind untereinander nur in der Ebene verbunden und bilden ein Netz mit sechseckigen Maschen,...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

11. BusinessForum21-Kongress „Aktives Schadenmanagement"

22.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Internationale Konferenz zum Biomining ab Sonntag in Freiberg

22.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Die Erde und ihre Bestandteile im Fokus

21.09.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

11. BusinessForum21-Kongress „Aktives Schadenmanagement"

22.09.2017 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

DFG bewilligt drei neue Forschergruppen und eine neue Klinische Forschergruppe

22.09.2017 | Förderungen Preise

Lebendiges Gewebe aus dem Drucker

22.09.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie