Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Engineering a Photo-Switch for Nerve Cells in the Eye and Brain

16.11.2012
Chemists and vision scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago have designed a light-sensitive molecule that can stimulate a neural response in cells of the retina and brain -- a possible first step to overcoming degenerative eye diseases like age-related macular degeneration, or to quieting epileptic seizures.

Their results are reported online in the journal Nature Communications.

Macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss in people over 50, is caused by loss of light-sensitive cells in the retina -- the rods and cones.

"The rods and cones, which absorb light and initiate visual signals, are the broken link in the chain, even though what we call the 'inner cells' of the retina, in many cases, are still potentially capable of function," says David Pepperberg, professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences in the UIC College of Medicine, the principal investigator on the study.

"Our approach is to bypass the lost rods and cones, by making the inner cells responsive to light."

Pepperberg and his colleagues are trying to develop light-sensitive molecules that -- when injected into the eye -- can find their way to inner retinal cells, attach themselves, and initiate the signal that is sent to the brain.

The researchers synthesized new compounds built upon the well-known anesthetic agent propofol, a small molecule that binds to a receptor-protein on nerve cells. The receptor is ordinarily activated by the neurotransmitter GABA, and when so activated it opens a channel in the membrane of the cell to initiate a signal that propagates to other nerve cells.

Chemists led by Karol Bruzik, professor of medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy in the UIC College of Pharmacy, succeeded in adding-on a light-sensitive chemical component to the propofol molecule. When struck by light of different wavelengths, the molecule changes shape and functions as a light-triggered, on-off switch for these receptors.

The research team tested the new compound, code name MPC088, in three different types of cells: retinal ganglion cells, the nerve cells that send visual signals from the retina to the brain via the optic nerve; Purkinje neurons from the cerebellum; and non-nerve cells that were specially engineered to produce and install the GABA receptor in their membrane.

MPC088 binds to the receptor and makes it far more responsive to GABA. Light of appropriate wavelengths converts the MPC088 to an inactive form and back again, reducing and then restoring the high sensitivity to GABA, which opens the membrane channel to initiate the neural signal.

"Putting it all together, we have a compound that dramatically regulates, in light-dependent fashion, the GABA receptors of both an engineered receptor system and native receptors of retinal ganglion cells and brain neurons," Pepperberg said.

The experiments on the Purkinje neurons of the cerebellum, conducted in collaboration with neurobiologist Thomas Otis at the University of California at Los Angeles, "showed we were able to go beyond visual systems," Pepperberg said, and demonstrate that "photo-regulation may also have potential as a therapeutic for epilepsy, a class of diseases that involves abnormal excitatory activity in the brain."

Epileptic seizures begin in a defined region of the brain, and it may become possible to introduce a photo-switching compound and a very thin light-guide into this region, Pepperberg said.

"Because GABA receptors are typically inhibitory, introducing light of the appropriate wavelength into the region as the seizure begins and activating the GABA receptors could have the effect of turning off the seizure."

The researchers also created a molecular switch related to MPC088 that can permanently anchor a genetically engineered GABA receptor, demonstrating the possibility that a light-sensitive molecule could be introduced into the eye or brain to modify GABA receptors and act as a photo-switch.

"Our work opens up new avenues for not only the retinal application but also diseases of the central nervous system where a dysfunction or deficiency of GABA activity is a key problem," Pepperberg said.

Co-first authors on the paper were UIC bioengineering graduate student Lan Yue, UIC medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy postdoctoral researcher Michal Pawlowski, and UCLA postdoctoral researcher Shlomo Dellal. Other authors were An Xie, Feng Feng, and Haohua Qian from the UIC department of ophthalmology and visual sciences.

This study was supported by National Institutes of Health grants EY016094, EY001792 and AA01973; the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Foundation; Hope for Vision; the Beckman Institute for Macular Research; the American Health Assistance Foundation; Research to Prevent Blindness; and UIC Center for Clinical and Translational Science award UL1RR029879.

[Editors note: images available at http://newsphoto.lib.uic.edu/v/pepperberg/]

Jeanne Galatzer-Levy | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uic.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht More than just a mechanical barrier – epithelial cells actively combat the flu virus
04.05.2016 | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

nachricht Discovery of a fundamental limit to the evolution of the genetic code
03.05.2016 | Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Sei mit STARS4ALL dabei, wenn Merkur vor die Sonne wandert

2012 war es die Venus, in diesem Jahr ist der Planet Merkur dran, vor der Sonne zu passieren. Für fast acht Stunden werden wir am 9. Mai 2016 die Möglichkeit haben, den Planeten Merkur als kleinen schwarzen Punkt auf der Oberfläche der Sonne durchziehen zu sehen. Das EU-Projekt STARS4ALL, an dem auch das IGB beteiligt ist, wird in Zusammenarbeit mit www.sky-live.tv das Phänomen von Teneriffa und von Island aus live übertragen. STARS4ALL bietet dazu Bildungsmaterial für Schüler an.

Am 9. Mai 2016, um die Mittagszeit, wird der Planet Merkur anfangen, die Scheibe der Sonne zu kreuzen; eine Reise, welche über sieben Stunden dauern wird.

Im Focus: MICROSCOPE sendet

Am Montag, 2. Mai 2016, erreichte die Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler vom Zentrum für angewandte Raumfahrttechnologie und Mikrogravitation (ZARM) der Universität Bremen die erste Erfolgsmeldung von ihrem Forschungs-Satelliten. Per Videoübertragung waren sie zugeschaltet, als die französischen Kollegen das Experiment an Bord von MICROSCOPE (MICRO Satellite à traînée Compensée pour l'Observation du Principe d'Equivalence) initialisierten und das Messinstrument die ersten Testdaten übermittelte. Damit ist der wichtigste Meilenstein der Testphase erreicht, bevor sich herausstellt, ob Einsteins Relativitätstheorie auch nach dieser Satellitenmission noch Bestand haben wird.

“#TSAGE @onera_fr is on. The test masses have been released and servo looped!!!! Great all green“ lautet die Twitter-Nachricht der französischen Partner, die...

Im Focus: Genauester Spiegel der Welt bei European XFEL in Hamburg eingetroffen

Der vermutlich präziseste Spiegel der Welt ist bei European XFEL in der Metropolregion Hamburg eingetroffen. Der 95 Zentimeter lange Spiegel ist ein wichtiges Bauteil des Röntgenlasers, der 2017 in Betrieb gehen soll. Auf den ersten Blick sieht er einem normalen Spiegel durchaus ähnlich, ist jedoch extrem flach und glatt. Die größten Unebenheiten auf seiner Oberfläche haben eine Dimension von gerade einmal einem Nanometer, einem milliardstel Meter. Diese Präzision entspräche einer 40 Kilometer langen Straße, deren maximale Unebenheit gerade einmal so groß ist wie der Durchmesser eines Haars.

Der Röntgenspiegel ist der erste von mehreren, die an unterschiedlichen Stellen der Anlage zum Spiegeln und Filtern des Röntgenlaserstrahls eingebaut werden....

Im Focus: Erste Filmaufnahmen von Kernporen

Mithilfe eines extrem schnellen und präzisen Rasterkraftmikroskops haben Forscher der Universität Basel erstmals «lebendige» Kernporenkomplexe bei der Arbeit gefilmt. Kernporen sind molekulare Maschinen, die den Verkehr in und aus dem Zellkern kontrollieren. In ihrem kürzlich in «Nature Nanotechnology» publizierten Artikel erklären die Forscher, wie bewegliche «Tentakeln» in der Pore die Passage von unerwünschten Molekülen verhindern.

Das Rasterkraftmikroskop (AFM) ist kein Mikroskop zum Durchschauen. Es tastet wie ein Blinder mit seinen Fingern die Oberflächen mit einer extrem feinen Spitze...

Im Focus: Nuclear Pores Captured on Film

Using an ultra fast-scanning atomic force microscope, a team of researchers from the University of Basel has filmed “living” nuclear pore complexes at work for the first time. Nuclear pores are molecular machines that control the traffic entering or exiting the cell nucleus. In their article published in Nature Nanotechnology, the researchers explain how the passage of unwanted molecules is prevented by rapidly moving molecular “tentacles” inside the pore.

Using high-speed AFM, Roderick Lim, Argovia Professor at the Biozentrum and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute of the University of Basel, has not only directly...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Diabetes Kongress in Berlin beginnt heute

04.05.2016 | Veranstaltungen

UFW-Fachtagung im Vorzeichen von Big Data und Industrie 4.0

03.05.2016 | Veranstaltungen

analytica conference 2016 in München - Foodomics, mehr als nur ein Modebegriff?

03.05.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Beim Laden von Lithium-Luft-Akkus entsteht hochreaktiver Singulett-Sauerstoff

04.05.2016 | Energie und Elektrotechnik

Sei mit STARS4ALL dabei, wenn Merkur vor die Sonne wandert

04.05.2016 | Physik Astronomie

Mehr als eine mechanische Barriere - Epithelzellen kämpfen aktiv gegen das Grippevirus

04.05.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie