Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

These Bots were made for Walking: Cells Power Biological Machines

16.11.2012
They’re soft, biocompatible, about 7 millimeters long – and, incredibly, able to walk by themselves. Miniature “bio-bots” developed at the University of Illinois are making tracks in synthetic biology.

Designing non-electronic biological machines has been a riddle that scientists at the interface of biology and engineering have struggled to solve. The walking bio-bots demonstrate the Illinois team’s ability to forward-engineer functional machines using only hydrogel, heart cells and a 3-D printer.

With an altered design, the bio-bots could be customized for specific applications in medicine, energy or the environment. The research team, led by U. of I. professor Rashid Bashir, published its results in the journal Scientific Reports.

“The idea is that, by being able to design with biological structures, we can harness the power of cells and nature to address challenges facing society,” said Bashir, an Abel Bliss Professor of Engineering. “As engineers, we’ve always built things with hard materials, materials that are very predictable. Yet there are a lot of applications where nature solves a problem in such an elegant way. Can we replicate some of that if we can understand how to put things together with cells?”

The key to the bio-bots’ locomotion is asymmetry. Resembling a tiny springboard, each bot has one long, thin leg resting on a stout supporting leg. The thin leg is covered with rat cardiac cells. When the heart cells beat, the long leg pulses, propelling the bio-bot forward.

The team uses a 3-D printing method common in rapid prototyping to make the main body of the bot from hydrogel, a soft gelatin-like polymer. This approach allowed the researchers to explore various conformations and adjust their design for maximum speed. The ease of quickly altering design also will allow them to build and test other configurations with an eye toward potential applications.

For example, Bashir envisions the bio-bots being used for drug screening or chemical analysis, since the bots’ motion can indicate how the cells are responding to the environment. By integrating cells that respond to certain stimuli, such as chemical gradients, the bio-bots could be used as sensors.

“Our goal is to see if we can get this thing to move toward chemical gradients, so we could eventually design something that can look for a specific toxin and then try to neutralize it,” said Bashir, who also is a professor of electrical and computer engineering, and of bioengineering. “Now you can think about a sensor that’s moving and constantly sampling and doing something useful, in medicine and the environment. The applications could be many, depending on what cell types we use and where we want to go with it.”

Next, the team will work to enhance control and function, such as integrating neurons to direct motion or cells that respond to light. They are also working on creating robots of different shapes, different numbers of legs, and robots that could climb slopes or steps.

“The idea here is that you can do it by forward-engineering,” said Bashir, who is the director of the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory. “We have the design rules to make these millimeter-scale shapes and different physical architectures, which hasn’t been done with this level of control. What we want to do now is add more functionality to it.”

“I think we are just beginning to scratch the surface in this regard,” said graduate student Vincent Chan, first author of the paper. “That is what’s so exciting about this technology – to be able to exploit some of nature’s unique capabilities and utilize it for other beneficial purposes or functions.”

The National Science Foundation supported this work through a Science and Technology Center (Emergent Behavior of Integrated Cellular Systems).

Graduate student Mitchell Collens, postdoctoral researcher Kidong Park, chemical and biological engineering professor Hyunjoon Kong, and mechanical science and engineering professor Taher Saif were co-authors of the paper. Bashir also is affiliated with the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and the Institute for Genomic Biology at the U. of I.

Editor’s notes: To reach Rashid Bashir, call 217-333-3097; email rbashir@illinois.edu.

The paper, “Development of miniaturized walking biological machines,” is available online:

http://www.nature.com/srep/2012/121115/srep00857/full/srep00857.html

Liz Ahlberg | University of Illinois
Further information:
http://www.illinois.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Surprising similarity in fly and mouse motion vision
30.07.2015 | Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, Martinsried

nachricht Intracellular microlasers could allow precise labeling of a trillion individual cells
30.07.2015 | Massachusetts General Hospital

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Superschneller Wellenritt im Kristall: Elektronik auf Zeitskala einzelner Lichtschwingungen möglich

Physikern der Universitäten Regensburg und Marburg ist es gelungen, die von einem starken Lichtfeld getriebene Bewegung von Elektronen in einem Halbleiter in extremer Zeitlupe zu beobachten. Dabei konnten sie ein grundlegend neues Quantenphänomen entschlüsseln. Die Ergebnisse der Wissenschaftler sind jetzt in der renommierten Fachzeitschrift „Nature“ veröffentlicht worden (DOI: 10.1038/nature14652).

Die rasante Entwicklung in der Elektronik mit Taktraten bis in den Gigahertz-Bereich hat unser Alltagsleben revolutioniert. Sie stellt jedoch auch Forscher...

Im Focus: On the crest of the wave: Electronics on a time scale shorter than a cycle of light

Physicists from Regensburg and Marburg, Germany have succeeded in taking a slow-motion movie of speeding electrons in a solid driven by a strong light wave. In the process, they have unraveled a novel quantum phenomenon, which will be reported in the forthcoming edition of Nature.

The advent of ever faster electronics featuring clock rates up to the multiple-gigahertz range has revolutionized our day-to-day life. Researchers and...

Im Focus: Erster Nachweis von Lithium in einem explodierenden Stern

Erstmals konnte das chemische Element Lithium in der ausgestoßenen Materie einer Nova nachgewiesen werden. Beobachtungen von Nova Centauri 2013 mit Teleskopen des La Silla-Observatoriums der ESO und in der Nähe von Santiago de Chile helfen bei der Aufklärung des Rätsels, warum so viele junge Sterne mehr von diesem Element enthalten als erwartet. Diese Entdeckung liefert ein seit langem fehlendes Teil im Puzzle der chemischen Entwicklungsgeschichte unserer Galaxie und ist ein großer Fortschritt für das Verständnis des Mischungsverhältnisses der chemischen Elemente in den Sternen unserer Milchstraße.

Das leichte chemische Element Lithium ist eines der wenigen Elemente, das nach unserer Modellvorstellung auch beim Urknall vor 13,8 Milliarden Jahren...

Im Focus: Durch den Monsun: Flugzeugmission zu Auswirkungen auf Luftqualität und Klimawandel

Mit dem Flugzeug von Zypern auf die Malediven und zurück. Was nach einer Urlaubsreise klingt, ist für 65 Atmosphärenforscher aus ganz Deutschland anspruchsvolle Arbeit: Bei einer Forschungsmission mit dem Flugzeug HALO des Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt untersuchen sie derzeit, ob und wie sich die Monsun-Regenfälle in Asien auf die Selbstreinigungskraft der Atmosphäre auswirken. Mit an Bord sind auch zwei Messgeräte des Karlsruher Instituts für Technologie (KIT): Die Karlsruher Klimaforscher messen dabei unter anderem die Konzentrationen von Ozon und Aceton. Das Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie in Mainz koordiniert die Kampagne.

„Die Erdatmosphäre kann sich von Treibhausgasen oder Abgasen aus dem Verkehr selbst reinigen. Dabei wandeln Hydroxyl-Radikale – das sind besonders...

Im Focus: Lichtschalter auf DVD

Da sich die elektronischen Eigenschaften eines optischen Speichermaterials schneller ändern als seine Struktur, könnte es neue Anwendungen finden

In DVDs steckt möglicherweise mehr als bisher angenommen. Das Material aus Germanium, Antimon und Tellur, in dem die Datenträger Information speichern, könnte...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Tagung „Brandschutz im Tank- und Gefahrgutlager“ am 16. November 2015 im Essener Haus der Technik stellt praktische Lösungen vor

30.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

12. BMBF-Forum für Nachhaltigkeit: Green Economy, Energiewende und die Zukunft der Städte

30.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Elektropott: Ruhrgebiets-Hackathon soll Innovation, Kreativität und Teamgeist junger Talente fördern

29.07.2015 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Effiziente Infrarot-Wärme spart Zeit und Energie bei der Herstellung von Autoteppichen

30.07.2015 | Messenachrichten

Deutsche Börse platziert Hybridanleihe im Volumen von EUR 600 Millionen

30.07.2015 | Wirtschaft Finanzen

Tagung „Brandschutz im Tank- und Gefahrgutlager“ am 16. November 2015 im Essener Haus der Technik stellt praktische Lösungen vor

30.07.2015 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten