Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

These Bots were made for Walking: Cells Power Biological Machines

16.11.2012
They’re soft, biocompatible, about 7 millimeters long – and, incredibly, able to walk by themselves. Miniature “bio-bots” developed at the University of Illinois are making tracks in synthetic biology.

Designing non-electronic biological machines has been a riddle that scientists at the interface of biology and engineering have struggled to solve. The walking bio-bots demonstrate the Illinois team’s ability to forward-engineer functional machines using only hydrogel, heart cells and a 3-D printer.

With an altered design, the bio-bots could be customized for specific applications in medicine, energy or the environment. The research team, led by U. of I. professor Rashid Bashir, published its results in the journal Scientific Reports.

“The idea is that, by being able to design with biological structures, we can harness the power of cells and nature to address challenges facing society,” said Bashir, an Abel Bliss Professor of Engineering. “As engineers, we’ve always built things with hard materials, materials that are very predictable. Yet there are a lot of applications where nature solves a problem in such an elegant way. Can we replicate some of that if we can understand how to put things together with cells?”

The key to the bio-bots’ locomotion is asymmetry. Resembling a tiny springboard, each bot has one long, thin leg resting on a stout supporting leg. The thin leg is covered with rat cardiac cells. When the heart cells beat, the long leg pulses, propelling the bio-bot forward.

The team uses a 3-D printing method common in rapid prototyping to make the main body of the bot from hydrogel, a soft gelatin-like polymer. This approach allowed the researchers to explore various conformations and adjust their design for maximum speed. The ease of quickly altering design also will allow them to build and test other configurations with an eye toward potential applications.

For example, Bashir envisions the bio-bots being used for drug screening or chemical analysis, since the bots’ motion can indicate how the cells are responding to the environment. By integrating cells that respond to certain stimuli, such as chemical gradients, the bio-bots could be used as sensors.

“Our goal is to see if we can get this thing to move toward chemical gradients, so we could eventually design something that can look for a specific toxin and then try to neutralize it,” said Bashir, who also is a professor of electrical and computer engineering, and of bioengineering. “Now you can think about a sensor that’s moving and constantly sampling and doing something useful, in medicine and the environment. The applications could be many, depending on what cell types we use and where we want to go with it.”

Next, the team will work to enhance control and function, such as integrating neurons to direct motion or cells that respond to light. They are also working on creating robots of different shapes, different numbers of legs, and robots that could climb slopes or steps.

“The idea here is that you can do it by forward-engineering,” said Bashir, who is the director of the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory. “We have the design rules to make these millimeter-scale shapes and different physical architectures, which hasn’t been done with this level of control. What we want to do now is add more functionality to it.”

“I think we are just beginning to scratch the surface in this regard,” said graduate student Vincent Chan, first author of the paper. “That is what’s so exciting about this technology – to be able to exploit some of nature’s unique capabilities and utilize it for other beneficial purposes or functions.”

The National Science Foundation supported this work through a Science and Technology Center (Emergent Behavior of Integrated Cellular Systems).

Graduate student Mitchell Collens, postdoctoral researcher Kidong Park, chemical and biological engineering professor Hyunjoon Kong, and mechanical science and engineering professor Taher Saif were co-authors of the paper. Bashir also is affiliated with the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and the Institute for Genomic Biology at the U. of I.

Editor’s notes: To reach Rashid Bashir, call 217-333-3097; email rbashir@illinois.edu.

The paper, “Development of miniaturized walking biological machines,” is available online:

http://www.nature.com/srep/2012/121115/srep00857/full/srep00857.html

Liz Ahlberg | University of Illinois
Further information:
http://www.illinois.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Link Discovered between Immune System, Brain Structure and Memory
26.04.2017 | Universität Basel

nachricht Researchers develop eco-friendly, 4-in-1 catalyst
25.04.2017 | Brown University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Weltweit einzigartiger Windkanal im Leipziger Wolkenlabor hat Betrieb aufgenommen

Am Leibniz-Institut für Troposphärenforschung (TROPOS) ist am Dienstag eine weltweit einzigartige Anlage in Betrieb genommen worden, mit der die Einflüsse von Turbulenzen auf Wolkenprozesse unter präzise einstellbaren Versuchsbedingungen untersucht werden können. Der neue Windkanal ist Teil des Leipziger Wolkenlabors, in dem seit 2006 verschiedenste Wolkenprozesse simuliert werden. Unter Laborbedingungen wurden z.B. das Entstehen und Gefrieren von Wolken nachgestellt. Wie stark Luftverwirbelungen diese Prozesse beeinflussen, konnte bisher noch nicht untersucht werden. Deshalb entstand in den letzten Jahren eine ergänzende Anlage für rund eine Million Euro.

Die von dieser Anlage zu erwarteten neuen Erkenntnisse sind wichtig für das Verständnis von Wetter und Klima, wie etwa die Bildung von Niederschlag und die...

Im Focus: Nanoskopie auf dem Chip: Mikroskopie in HD-Qualität

Neue Erfindung der Universitäten Bielefeld und Tromsø (Norwegen)

Physiker der Universität Bielefeld und der norwegischen Universität Tromsø haben einen Chip entwickelt, der super-auflösende Lichtmikroskopie, auch...

Im Focus: Löschbare Tinte für den 3-D-Druck

Im 3-D-Druckverfahren durch Direktes Laserschreiben können Mikrometer-große Strukturen mit genau definierten Eigenschaften geschrieben werden. Forscher des Karlsruher Institus für Technologie (KIT) haben ein Verfahren entwickelt, durch das sich die 3-D-Tinte für die Drucker wieder ‚wegwischen‘ lässt. Die bis zu hundert Nanometer kleinen Strukturen lassen sich dadurch wiederholt auflösen und neu schreiben - ein Nanometer entspricht einem millionstel Millimeter. Die Entwicklung eröffnet der 3-D-Fertigungstechnik vielfältige neue Anwendungen, zum Beispiel in der Biologie oder Materialentwicklung.

Beim Direkten Laserschreiben erzeugt ein computergesteuerter, fokussierter Laserstrahl in einem Fotolack wie ein Stift die Struktur. „Eine Tinte zu entwickeln,...

Im Focus: Leichtbau serientauglich machen

Immer mehr Autobauer setzen auf Karosserieteile aus kohlenstofffaserverstärktem Kunststoff (CFK). Dennoch müssen Fertigungs- und Reparaturkosten weiter gesenkt werden, um CFK kostengünstig nutzbar zu machen. Das Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) hat daher zusammen mit der Volkswagen AG und fünf weiteren Partnern im Projekt HolQueSt 3D Laserprozesse zum automatisierten Besäumen, Bohren und Reparieren von dreidimensionalen Bauteilen entwickelt.

Automatisiert ablaufende Bearbeitungsprozesse sind die Grundlage, um CFK-Bauteile endgültig in die Serienproduktion zu bringen. Ausgerichtet an einem...

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Ballungsräume Europas

26.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

200 Weltneuheiten beim Innovationstag Mittelstand in Berlin

26.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

123. Internistenkongress: Wie digitale Technik die Patientenversorgung verändert

26.04.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Akute Myeloische Leukämie: Ulmer erforschen bisher unbekannten Mechanismus der Blutkrebsentstehung

26.04.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Naturkatastrophen kosten Winzer jährlich Milliarden

26.04.2017 | Interdisziplinäre Forschung

Zusammenhang zwischen Immunsystem, Hirnstruktur und Gedächtnis entdeckt

26.04.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie