Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

These Bots were made for Walking: Cells Power Biological Machines

16.11.2012
They’re soft, biocompatible, about 7 millimeters long – and, incredibly, able to walk by themselves. Miniature “bio-bots” developed at the University of Illinois are making tracks in synthetic biology.

Designing non-electronic biological machines has been a riddle that scientists at the interface of biology and engineering have struggled to solve. The walking bio-bots demonstrate the Illinois team’s ability to forward-engineer functional machines using only hydrogel, heart cells and a 3-D printer.

With an altered design, the bio-bots could be customized for specific applications in medicine, energy or the environment. The research team, led by U. of I. professor Rashid Bashir, published its results in the journal Scientific Reports.

“The idea is that, by being able to design with biological structures, we can harness the power of cells and nature to address challenges facing society,” said Bashir, an Abel Bliss Professor of Engineering. “As engineers, we’ve always built things with hard materials, materials that are very predictable. Yet there are a lot of applications where nature solves a problem in such an elegant way. Can we replicate some of that if we can understand how to put things together with cells?”

The key to the bio-bots’ locomotion is asymmetry. Resembling a tiny springboard, each bot has one long, thin leg resting on a stout supporting leg. The thin leg is covered with rat cardiac cells. When the heart cells beat, the long leg pulses, propelling the bio-bot forward.

The team uses a 3-D printing method common in rapid prototyping to make the main body of the bot from hydrogel, a soft gelatin-like polymer. This approach allowed the researchers to explore various conformations and adjust their design for maximum speed. The ease of quickly altering design also will allow them to build and test other configurations with an eye toward potential applications.

For example, Bashir envisions the bio-bots being used for drug screening or chemical analysis, since the bots’ motion can indicate how the cells are responding to the environment. By integrating cells that respond to certain stimuli, such as chemical gradients, the bio-bots could be used as sensors.

“Our goal is to see if we can get this thing to move toward chemical gradients, so we could eventually design something that can look for a specific toxin and then try to neutralize it,” said Bashir, who also is a professor of electrical and computer engineering, and of bioengineering. “Now you can think about a sensor that’s moving and constantly sampling and doing something useful, in medicine and the environment. The applications could be many, depending on what cell types we use and where we want to go with it.”

Next, the team will work to enhance control and function, such as integrating neurons to direct motion or cells that respond to light. They are also working on creating robots of different shapes, different numbers of legs, and robots that could climb slopes or steps.

“The idea here is that you can do it by forward-engineering,” said Bashir, who is the director of the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory. “We have the design rules to make these millimeter-scale shapes and different physical architectures, which hasn’t been done with this level of control. What we want to do now is add more functionality to it.”

“I think we are just beginning to scratch the surface in this regard,” said graduate student Vincent Chan, first author of the paper. “That is what’s so exciting about this technology – to be able to exploit some of nature’s unique capabilities and utilize it for other beneficial purposes or functions.”

The National Science Foundation supported this work through a Science and Technology Center (Emergent Behavior of Integrated Cellular Systems).

Graduate student Mitchell Collens, postdoctoral researcher Kidong Park, chemical and biological engineering professor Hyunjoon Kong, and mechanical science and engineering professor Taher Saif were co-authors of the paper. Bashir also is affiliated with the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and the Institute for Genomic Biology at the U. of I.

Editor’s notes: To reach Rashid Bashir, call 217-333-3097; email rbashir@illinois.edu.

The paper, “Development of miniaturized walking biological machines,” is available online:

http://www.nature.com/srep/2012/121115/srep00857/full/srep00857.html

Liz Ahlberg | University of Illinois
Further information:
http://www.illinois.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Rice study decodes genetic circuitry for bacterial spore formation
24.05.2016 | Rice University

nachricht How Neural Circuits Implement Natural Vision
24.05.2016 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Mit atomarer Präzision: Technologien für die übernächste Chipgeneration

Im Projekt »Beyond EUV« entwickeln die Fraunhofer-Institute für Lasertechnik ILT in Aachen und für angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik IOF in Jena wesentliche Technologien zur Fertigung einer neuen Generation von Mikrochips mit EUV-Strahlung bei 6,7 nm. Die Strukturen sind dann kaum noch dicker als einzelne Atome und ermöglichen besonders hoch integrierte Schaltkreise zum Beispiel für Wearables oder gedankengesteuerte Prothesen.

Gordon Moore formulierte 1965 das später nach ihm benannte Gesetz, wonach sich alle ein bis zwei Jahre die Komplexität integrierter Schaltungen verdoppelt. Er...

Im Focus: Ein negatives Enzym liefert positive Resultate

In den letzten zwanzig Jahren hat die Chemie viele wichtige Instrumente und Verfahren für die Biologie hervorgebracht. Heute können wir Proteine herstellen, die in der Natur bisher nicht vorkommen. Es lassen sich Bilder von Ausschnitten lebender Zellen aufnehmen und sogar einzelne Zellen in lebendigen Tieren beobachten. Diese Woche haben zwei Forschungsgruppen der Universitäten Basel und Genf, die beide dem Nationalen Forschungsschwerpunkt Molecular Systems Engineering angehören, im Forschungsmagazin «ACS Central Science» präsentiert, wie man ein nicht-natürliches Protein designt, das völlig neue Fähigkeiten aufweist.

Proteine sind die Arbeitspferde jeder Zelle. Sie bestehen aus Aminosäurebausteinen, die als Kette verbunden sind, welche sich zu funktionalen Maschinen...

Im Focus: Atomic precision: technologies for the next-but-one generation of microchips

In the Beyond EUV project, the Fraunhofer Institutes for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen and for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF in Jena are developing key technologies for the manufacture of a new generation of microchips using EUV radiation at a wavelength of 6.7 nm. The resulting structures are barely thicker than single atoms, and they make it possible to produce extremely integrated circuits for such items as wearables or mind-controlled prosthetic limbs.

In 1965 Gordon Moore formulated the law that came to be named after him, which states that the complexity of integrated circuits doubles every one to two...

Im Focus: FS POSEIDON startet zur 500. Expedition

Das am GEOMAR Helmholtz-Zentrum für Ozeanforschung Kiel beheimatete Forschungsschiff POSEIDON startet diese Woche zu seiner 500. Expedition. Während der Jubiläumsfahrt untersuchen und kartieren Meeresgeologen des MARUM – Zentrum für Marine Umweltwissenschaften der Universität Bremen den Kontinentalhang vor der südfranzösischen Hafenstadt Nizza. Ziel der Arbeiten ist es, die Gefahr von Hangrutschungen und letztendlich auch Tsunamis besser abschätzen zu können.

Am kommenden Mittwoch heißt es wieder einmal „Leinen los“ für die POSEIDON. Von Catania auf Sizilien aus nimmt das 60 Meter lange Forschungsschiff Kurs auf die...

Im Focus: Spinströme: Riesengroß und ultraschnell

Mit einer neuen Methode der TU Wien lassen sich extrem starke Spinströme herstellen. Sie sind wichtig für die Spintronik, die unsere herkömmliche Elektronik ablösen könnte.

In unseren Computerchips wird Information in Form von elektrischer Ladung übertragen. Elektronen oder andere Ladungsträger werden von einem Ort zum anderen...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

„Zukunftsforum Assekuranz“ 2016 am 21. und 22. Juni 2016 in Köln

24.05.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Chemische Biologie im Fokus

24.05.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Innovationen für Laserexperten und Anwender - Universität Stuttgart bei Stuttgarter Lasertagen 2016

24.05.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Neuartige Terahertz-Quelle: kompakt und kostensparend

24.05.2016 | Physik Astronomie

Baufritz-Musterhaus „NaturDesign“ übt sich in Understatement: Gesundes Wohnen mit Stil

24.05.2016 | Architektur Bauwesen

„Zukunftsforum Assekuranz“ 2016 am 21. und 22. Juni 2016 in Köln

24.05.2016 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten