Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Good vibrations

03.12.2001


Honeycomb geometry helps dancing bees gather an audience.


Moving and shaking: honeycomb is a natural amplifier.
© M. Kleinhenz



If you want to catch someone’s attention on the dance floor, it helps if you’re dancing on a honeycomb. Vibrations from a dancing honeybee are naturally amplified by the hexagonal comb, a new study finds1.

... mehr zu:
»honeycomb


The work may explain how bees attract observers to the intricate dances that tell them where to find distant food sources. It could also help architects understand how to build earthquake-proof buildings.

The waggling dance of forager bees is "one of the most spectacular forms of animal communication," says Thomas Seeley, who studies bees moving and shaking at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. A single dance can convey the location of a field of flowers as far as 10 kilometres away.

Researchers have long understood how dances encode the location of a food source, but how - in the complete darkness of the hive - the dancer attracts bees to watch the dance has been a mystery.

Clues emerged from previous work by Jurgen Tautz of the University of Wurzburg in Germany, a member of the team that carried out the new study. He showed that dancing bees produce a weak, low-frequency vibration in the comb. When the vibration was blocked, the number of bees that watched a dance dropped by 75 per cent.

But the vibration is produced amid a swarm of tens of thousands of bees. "The riddle for us was how the bees could detect such weak vibrations in such a noisy environment," Tautz says.

To figure it out, the team sought inspiration from astronomy. "If astronomers want to detect a very weak signal in space, they don’t use one antenna but several spread out, and compare the results," Tautz says. "We thought maybe the bees were doing the same thing, because they have six feet, which can all make contact with different spots on the honeycomb surface to register the vibrations."

Phased not confused

When the researchers looked at how vibrations spread around the comb, they found that in most places, opposite walls of each hexagonal cell vibrated in the same direction at the same time. But at a distance of two or three cells from the source of the vibrations, the walls vibrated in opposite directions, in what is called a ’phase reversal’.

"We were able to pick up the phase reversal with just two vibration detectors, so it seems likely that the bees can pick it up with their six," Tautz says. They found that most of the bees recruited by the dancer came from precisely this phase-shift zone.

"This is a very intriguing finding, because it suggests a source of information that hadn’t been considered before," says Fred Dyer, who studies the waggle dance at Michigan State University in East Lansing. But it is possible that other signals alert bees, like airborne vibrations from the dancer’s wings or smells and sounds coming from the dancer, he cautions.

The bees may rely on all these cues together, Seeley says. "Redundancy is a good thing in communication, because it reduces errors."

Knowledge to build on

It’s not clear why the hexagonal arrangement of honeycomb cells should create this phase reversal, says Tautz. But understanding the phenomenon might be valuable not just for bee experts but for architects. Tautz is working with architects at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena to design better steel skeletons for high-rise buildings.

"Vibrations in honeybee nests are like miniature earthquakes generated by the bees, so it’s very interesting to see how the structure responds to it," Tautz says. Understanding the phase reversal could help architects predict which parts of a building will be especially vulnerable to earthquakes, he says. They could then strengthen these areas, he suggests, or even introduce weak spots into non-critical areas of buildings to absorb harmful vibrations.

References

  1. Tautz, J. et al. Phase reversal of vibratory signals in honeycomb may assist dancing honeybees to attract their audience. J. Exp. Biol, 204, 3737 - 3746, (2001).


ERICA KLARREICH | © Nature News Service
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.nature.com/nsu/011206/011206-4.html

Weitere Berichte zu: honeycomb

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Biowissenschaften Chemie:

nachricht Pflanzlicher Wirkstoff lässt Wimpern wachsen
09.12.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Polymerforschung IAP

nachricht Wolkenbildung: Wie Feldspat als Gefrierkeim wirkt
09.12.2016 | Karlsruher Institut für Technologie

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Biowissenschaften Chemie >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Elektronenautobahn im Kristall

Physiker der Universität Würzburg haben an einer bestimmten Form topologischer Isolatoren eine überraschende Entdeckung gemacht. Die Erklärung für den Effekt findet sich in der Struktur der verwendeten Materialien. Ihre Arbeit haben die Forscher jetzt in Science veröffentlicht.

Sie sind das derzeit „heißeste Eisen“ der Physik, wie die Neue Zürcher Zeitung schreibt: topologische Isolatoren. Ihre Bedeutung wurde erst vor wenigen Wochen...

Im Focus: Electron highway inside crystal

Physicists of the University of Würzburg have made an astonishing discovery in a specific type of topological insulators. The effect is due to the structure of the materials used. The researchers have now published their work in the journal Science.

Topological insulators are currently the hot topic in physics according to the newspaper Neue Zürcher Zeitung. Only a few weeks ago, their importance was...

Im Focus: Rätsel um Mott-Isolatoren gelöst

Universelles Verhalten am Mott-Metall-Isolator-Übergang aufgedeckt

Die Ursache für den 1937 von Sir Nevill Francis Mott vorhergesagten Metall-Isolator-Übergang basiert auf der gegenseitigen Abstoßung der gleichnamig geladenen...

Im Focus: Poröse kristalline Materialien: TU Graz-Forscher zeigt Methode zum gezielten Wachstum

Mikroporöse Kristalle (MOFs) bergen große Potentiale für die funktionalen Materialien der Zukunft. Paolo Falcaro von der TU Graz et al zeigen in Nature Materials, wie man MOFs gezielt im großen Maßstab wachsen lässt.

„Metal-organic frameworks“ (MOFs) genannte poröse Kristalle bestehen aus metallischen Knotenpunkten mit organischen Molekülen als Verbindungselemente. Dank...

Im Focus: Gravitationswellen als Sensor für Dunkle Materie

Die mit der Entdeckung von Gravitationswellen entstandene neue Disziplin der Gravitationswellen-Astronomie bekommt eine weitere Aufgabe: die Suche nach Dunkler Materie. Diese könnte aus einem Bose-Einstein-Kondensat sehr leichter Teilchen bestehen. Wie Rechnungen zeigen, würden Gravitationswellen gebremst, wenn sie durch derartige Dunkle Materie laufen. Dies führt zu einer Verspätung von Gravitationswellen relativ zu Licht, die bereits mit den heutigen Detektoren messbar sein sollte.

Im Universum muss es gut fünfmal mehr unsichtbare als sichtbare Materie geben. Woraus diese Dunkle Materie besteht, ist immer noch unbekannt. Die...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Firmen- und Forschungsnetzwerk Munitect tagt am IOW

08.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

NRW Nano-Konferenz in Münster

07.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Wie aus reinen Daten ein verständliches Bild entsteht

05.12.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Hochgenaue Versuchsstände für dynamisch belastete Komponenten – Workshop zeigt Potenzial auf

09.12.2016 | Seminare Workshops

Ein Nano-Kreisverkehr für Licht

09.12.2016 | Physik Astronomie

Pflanzlicher Wirkstoff lässt Wimpern wachsen

09.12.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie