Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

EU policy makers signal a reappraisal of European innovation

16.03.2004


A fundamental change in attitude is needed if Europe is to fulfil its competitive potential, the current head of the Competitiveness Council and Irish Minister for Enterprise, Mary Harney, told the European Business Summit on 12 March.



’Europe’s political and business leaders have to change their thinking fast - policies won’t work,’ said Ms Harney. Laws and regulations will not make Europe competitive, she added, warning that on the contrary, they could actually stifle innovation.

Referring to a recent report by UK think tank Demos, Ms Harney said that talent, technology and tolerance have replaced traditional elements such as the availability of natural resources as the core components of competitiveness. ’Are we genuinely tolerant of new thinking and ideas in Europe? I would suggest no, not always,’ she said.


Ms Harney outlined her thoughts on what organisational changes must take place to improve Europe’s position. First, an increased proportion of the EU budget should be spent on research and innovation, especially basic research. This should be accompanied by the creation of better links between universities and companies, and a simplification of the rules of participation in the EU research Framework Programmes.

Second, policy makers should adopt a new approach to legislation designed to stimulate competitiveness by asking themselves: ’do we need it, and is it competitive?’ Ms Harney also highlighted implementation of the services directive and the adoption of a communication on the mobility of researchers as key to boosting competitiveness.

’Lisbon is the only agenda, and we have slipped, but we can still achieve it with a sense of urgency. [...] The Irish Presidency will use the Spring Council to revitalise the Lisbon agenda,’ Ms Harney promised delegates.

Later, the Summit was given an overview of the Commission’s forthcoming Innovation Action Plan by David White, Director of Enterprise policy at the Commission’s Enterprise DG. He told delegates that the Action Plan was designed to release Europe’s potential for innovation, not just in high tech fields, but within all sectors and companies.

Mr White said that the Action Plan would focus on three main areas: regulation, knowledge and resources. ’Good regulation creates a climate of confidence within which innovation takes place, whereas bad regulation can slowly strangle it,’ Mr White began.

Regulation, he said, is essential in order to balance public concern against commercial opportunities, and pointed to the issue of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) as an example of how hard it is to get that balance right. ’We don’t need no regulation, we need good regulation,’ he reiterated.

Second, the Action Plan will focus on creating a ’marketplace in knowledge’, where intellectual property is protected and exploited, where technology transfer is encouraged, and where people and companies are networked in clusters that are open to cooperation and new ideas.

Finally, the Action Plan will seek to ensure that the right resources for innovation are in place. This involves filling the current gap in the venture capital market, overcoming regional disadvantages to innovation, providing clear and simple state assistance, and investing in people’s skills and offering lifelong learning.

In order to achieve the objectives of the Innovation Action Plan, Mr White said: ’Governments need to pull together. Most innovative activity takes place at a regional or national level, but although innovation is essentially a local phenomenon, the framework in which it takes place is a common one.’

Mr White revealed that a two month consultation process on the Action Plan was expected to be launched in the coming weeks, with a view to its adoption by the Commission in July. He concluded by inviting the contribution of the business sector in the consultation process.

Virginia Mercouri | cn
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.ebsummit.org/
http://www.cordis.lu/innovation-services/
http://cordis.lu/ireland

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Bildung Wissenschaft:

nachricht Weiterbildung – für die Arbeitswelt von morgen unerlässlich!
15.02.2018 | Bundesinstitut für Berufsbildung (BIBB)

nachricht Roboter als Förderer frühkindlicher Bildung – Neues Forschungsprojekt an der Uni Paderborn
07.02.2018 | Universität Paderborn

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Bildung Wissenschaft >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Die Brücke, die sich dehnen kann

Brücken verformen sich, daher baut man normalerweise Dehnfugen ein. An der TU Wien wurde eine Technik entwickelt, die ohne Fugen auskommt und dadurch viel Geld und Aufwand spart.

Wer im Auto mit flottem Tempo über eine Brücke fährt, spürt es sofort: Meist rumpelt man am Anfang und am Ende der Brücke über eine Dehnfuge, die dort...

Im Focus: Eine Frage der Dynamik

Die meisten Ionenkanäle lassen nur eine ganz bestimmte Sorte von Ionen passieren, zum Beispiel Natrium- oder Kaliumionen. Daneben gibt es jedoch eine Reihe von Kanälen, die für beide Ionensorten durchlässig sind. Wie den Eiweißmolekülen das gelingt, hat jetzt ein Team um die Wissenschaftlerin Han Sun (FMP) und die Arbeitsgruppe von Adam Lange (FMP) herausgefunden. Solche nicht-selektiven Kanäle besäßen anders als die selektiven eine dynamische Struktur ihres Selektivitätsfilters, berichten die FMP-Forscher im Fachblatt Nature Communications. Dieser Filter könne zwei unterschiedliche Formen ausbilden, die jeweils nur eine der beiden Ionensorten passieren lassen.

Ionenkanäle sind für den Organismus von herausragender Bedeutung. Wenn zum Beispiel Sinnesreize wahrgenommen, ans Gehirn weitergeleitet und dort verarbeitet...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Erste integrierte Schaltkreise (IC) aus Plastik

Erstmals ist es einem Forscherteam am Max-Planck-Institut (MPI) für Polymerforschung in Mainz gelungen, einen integrierten Schaltkreis (IC) aus einer monomolekularen Schicht eines Halbleiterpolymers herzustellen. Dies erfolgte in einem sogenannten Bottom-Up-Ansatz durch einen selbstanordnenden Aufbau.

In diesem selbstanordnenden Aufbauprozess ordnen sich die Halbleiterpolymere als geordnete monomolekulare Schicht in einem Transistor an. Transistoren sind...

Im Focus: Quantenbits per Licht übertragen

Physiker aus Princeton, Konstanz und Maryland koppeln Quantenbits und Licht

Der Quantencomputer rückt näher: Neue Forschungsergebnisse zeigen das Potenzial von Licht als Medium, um Informationen zwischen sogenannten Quantenbits...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industrie & Wirtschaft
Veranstaltungen

Digitalisierung auf dem Prüfstand: Hochkarätige Konferenz zu Empowerment in der agilen Arbeitswelt

20.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Aachener Optiktage: Expertenwissen in zwei Konferenzen für die Glas- und Kunststoffoptikfertigung

19.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

Konferenz "Die Mobilität von morgen gestalten"

19.02.2018 | Veranstaltungen

VideoLinks
Wissenschaft & Forschung
Weitere VideoLinks im Überblick >>>
 
Aktuelle Beiträge

Highlight der Halbleiter-Forschung

20.02.2018 | Physik Astronomie

Wie verbessert man die Nahtqualität lasergeschweißter Textilien?

20.02.2018 | Materialwissenschaften

Der Bluthochdruckschalter in der Nebenniere

20.02.2018 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Weitere B2B-VideoLinks
IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics