Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Online Classes Provide Better Way toTeach Global Education, Researcher Says

13.05.2003


Web-based college classes are more than just a technological novelty for graduate students who are learning global education, according to an Ohio State University researcher.

... mehr zu:
»American »Education

Courses taught on the web allow Americans to interact with people from around the world and to learn new perspectives that they could never experience in a typical classroom, said Merry Merryfield, professor of social studies and global education at Ohio State University.

Online classes permit students to tackle more controversial subjects, ensure that all students participate equally, and give the opportunity for more thoughtful and in-depth discussions of issues, Merryfield found in a recent study.


Merryfield teaches graduate-level online classes on global education for teachers in the United States and around the world. In her study, she examined the online interaction of 92 American teachers who took her courses and 22 cultural consultants – educators from other countries that Merryfield hired to provide the American teachers with international perspectives. The results showed the value of online classes in global education, Merryfield said.

“Online technologies provide opportunities for teachers to experience a more global community than is possible face-to-face,” Merryfield said. “In a course I taught last summer, I had 65 people from 18 states and 12 countries. This diversity affected the course and the content in many ways, and greatly helped the learning process.”

Merryfield presented her findings April 22 in Chicago at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association.

While traditional classes with students meeting in a classroom have some advantages, online courses have their own strengths, she said.

For example, Merryfield found that web-based interaction allow discussion of sensitive and controversial topics that would be difficult in face-to-face settings. Students can discuss cultural and political issues – such as those involving terrorism and the war with Iraq – that they might be reluctant to do in a classroom. One student told Merryfield that “online discussions are like a veil that protects me” and allowed her to “feel safe enough to ask the hard questions” of other students in her class.

“People respond to text instead of a person’s physical presence, personality, accent or body language,” she said.

Students in Merryfield’s online courses have projects which they turn in and make available to other students to comment on and critique, she said. For example, at the beginning of class each student turns in a short bio explaining their experiences related to equity and diversity. Other students react online to these bios.

While in traditional classes students may stand up and talk a little about themselves, the online format give students more time to interact and comment about each other’s bios. In a class about global education, this helps tremendously in promoting cross-cultural interaction, according to Merryfield.

Online classes have another important advantage: they allow all students to participate equally. While in traditional classes a few students may dominate, Merryfield has rules in her web-based classes that set minimum and maximum numbers of messages each person posts.

“There is no possibility of a few people monopolizing a discussion, nor is anyone left out,” Merryfield said.

One of the main ways students communicate in the online class is through threaded discussion – an interactive discussion in which a person posts a message, people respond to it, and people can respond to those responses. Threaded discussions can occur on a variety of topics, such as the readings assigned to the students. These discussions can be much more meaningful and in-depth than oral discussions in a classroom.

“Discussions take place over several days, so people have time to look up references and share resources,” she said. “They have time to think, analyze and synthesize ideas. I have been amazed at how these threaded discussions increase both the depth of content and equity in participation.”

In her online classes, Merryfield has students complete a project of their choosing that has relevance to global education. For example, a teacher taking the class might do an in-depth project on African literature to help her teach her units on colonization. The online nature of the course helps students develop these projects in a variety of ways. For one, Merryfield has cultural consultants from areas around the world who can provide insight and advice. Also, unlike traditional classes, these projects aren’t just provided to the instructor – they are available for all the students to read, critique and use.

The projects that students work on can have immediate impacts for teachers around the world, Merryfield said. From these projects and other sources, Merryfield and her collaborators have created databases about certain countries, regions and issues in global education. When the latest conflict between the United States and Iraq erupted, Merryfield and colleagues took database information about Iraq and the Middle East and sent it to various listservs and published it in Social Education, the lead journal for social studies.

“It’s immediately getting the best resources we have about a certain part of the world in the hands of teachers so they can use it in their classrooms,” Merryfield said. “Traditionally, it would have taken 10 to 15 years to publish this information in textbooks.”

Overall, web-based courses can provide significant advantages for teaching global education, Merryfield said.

“Online technologies are the perfect tools for social studies and global education, as these fields focus on learning about the world and its peoples,” she said. “This provides opportunities for teachers to experience a more global community than is possible face to face.”

However, she noted, “All of us do need opportunities for face to face experiential learning with people of diverse cultures.”



Contact: Merry Merryfield, (614) 292-4314; Merryfield.1@osu.edu
Written by Jeff Grabmeier, (614) 292-8457; Grabmeier.1@osu.edu

Jeff Grabmeier | Ohio State University
Weitere Informationen:
http://www.osu.edu/researchnews/archive/globeduc.htm

Weitere Berichte zu: American Education

Weitere Nachrichten aus der Kategorie Bildung Wissenschaft:

nachricht Wie ein Roboter Kita-Kindern Sprachen beibringt
14.07.2017 | Universität Bielefeld

nachricht MINT Nachwuchsbarometer 2017: Digitale Bildung in Deutschland braucht ein Update
22.06.2017 | acatech - Deutsche Akademie der Technikwissenschaften

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Bildung Wissenschaft >>>

Die aktuellsten Pressemeldungen zum Suchbegriff Innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Unterwasserroboter soll nach einem Jahr in der arktischen Tiefsee auftauchen

Am Dienstag, den 22. August wird das Forschungsschiff Polarstern im norwegischen Tromsø zu einer besonderen Expedition in die Arktis starten: Der autonome Unterwasserroboter TRAMPER soll nach einem Jahr Einsatzzeit am arktischen Tiefseeboden auftauchen. Dieses Gerät und weitere robotische Systeme, die Tiefsee- und Weltraumforscher im Rahmen der Helmholtz-Allianz ROBEX gemeinsam entwickelt haben, werden nun knapp drei Wochen lang unter Realbedingungen getestet. ROBEX hat das Ziel, neue Technologien für die Erkundung schwer erreichbarer Gebiete mit extremen Umweltbedingungen zu entwickeln.

„Auftauchen wird der TRAMPER“, sagt Dr. Frank Wenzhöfer vom Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung (AWI) selbstbewusst. Der...

Im Focus: Mit Barcodes der Zellentwicklung auf der Spur

Darüber, wie sich Blutzellen entwickeln, existieren verschiedene Auffassungen – sie basieren jedoch fast ausschließlich auf Experimenten, die lediglich Momentaufnahmen widerspiegeln. Wissenschaftler des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums stellen nun im Fachjournal Nature eine neue Technik vor, mit der sich das Geschehen dynamisch erfassen lässt: Mithilfe eines „Zufallsgenerators“ versehen sie Blutstammzellen mit genetischen Barcodes und können so verfolgen, welche Zelltypen aus der Stammzelle hervorgehen. Diese Technik erlaubt künftig völlig neue Einblicke in die Entwicklung unterschiedlicher Gewebe sowie in die Krebsentstehung.

Wie entsteht die Vielzahl verschiedener Zelltypen im Blut? Diese Frage beschäftigt Wissenschaftler schon lange. Nach der klassischen Vorstellung fächern sich...

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Forscher entwickeln maisförmigen Arzneimittel-Transporter zum Inhalieren

Er sieht aus wie ein Maiskolben, ist winzig wie ein Bakterium und kann einen Wirkstoff direkt in die Lungenzellen liefern: Das zylinderförmige Vehikel für Arzneistoffe, das Pharmazeuten der Universität des Saarlandes entwickelt haben, kann inhaliert werden. Professor Marc Schneider und sein Team machen sich dabei die körpereigene Abwehr zunutze: Makrophagen, die Fresszellen des Immunsystems, fressen den gesundheitlich unbedenklichen „Nano-Mais“ und setzen dabei den in ihm enthaltenen Wirkstoff frei. Bei ihrer Forschung arbeiteten die Pharmazeuten mit Forschern der Medizinischen Fakultät der Saar-Uni, des Leibniz-Instituts für Neue Materialien und der Universität Marburg zusammen Ihre Forschungsergebnisse veröffentlichten die Wissenschaftler in der Fachzeitschrift Advanced Healthcare Materials. DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700478

Ein Medikament wirkt nur, wenn es dort ankommt, wo es wirken soll. Wird ein Mittel inhaliert, muss der Wirkstoff in der Lunge zuerst die Hindernisse...

Im Focus: Exotische Quantenzustände: Physiker erzeugen erstmals optische „Töpfe" für ein Super-Photon

Physikern der Universität Bonn ist es gelungen, optische Mulden und komplexere Muster zu erzeugen, in die das Licht eines Bose-Einstein-Kondensates fließt. Die Herstellung solch sehr verlustarmer Strukturen für Licht ist eine Voraussetzung für komplexe Schaltkreise für Licht, beispielsweise für die Quanteninformationsverarbeitung einer neuen Computergeneration. Die Wissenschaftler stellen nun ihre Ergebnisse im Fachjournal „Nature Photonics“ vor.

Lichtteilchen (Photonen) kommen als winzige, unteilbare Portionen vor. Viele Tausend dieser Licht-Portionen lassen sich zu einem einzigen Super-Photon...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

European Conference on Eye Movements: Internationale Tagung an der Bergischen Universität Wuppertal

18.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Einblicke ins menschliche Denken

17.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

Eröffnung der INC.worX-Erlebniswelt während der Technologie- und Innovationsmanagement-Tagung 2017

16.08.2017 | Veranstaltungen

 
VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Eine Karte der Zellkraftwerke

18.08.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Chronische Infektionen aushebeln: Ein neuer Wirkstoff auf dem Weg in die Entwicklung

18.08.2017 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Computer mit Köpfchen

18.08.2017 | Informationstechnologie