Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Wellness for dairy cows

08.03.2012
Does butter taste better when the cows are happy? How much is too much for a liter of milk? What will dairy cows of the future look like? What does a glass of milk have to do with environmental protection? Will cows be pastured in future, too?
These are some of the questions that the new Center of Integrated Dairy Research (Zentrum für Integrierte Milchwirtschaftliche Forschung) or "CIDRe" for short is looking to answer. Scientists from a wide range of disciplines are working in this recently established center at the University of Bonn for the benefit of a balanced and sustainable dairy industry.

For more than 10,000 years, humans have been using cows for obtaining milk and meat, as providers of fertilizer, and as draft animals. During cold periods, humans used the animals' skins or their leather for protection. In short, cattle helped humans survive under adverse conditions. The production conditions have, however, changed drastically over time. Originally, cows gave about eight liters of milk a day to feed a calf. Modern high-performance cows produce 50 liters a day now, sometimes at a dramatic price. "The dairy industry system has been off balance for quite some time," said Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Büscher, Speaker of the new Zentrum für Integrierte Milchwirtschaftliche Forschung at the University of Bonn (CIDRe).

Extreme increase in milk production results in problems

Due to the extreme increase in milk production, cows often need signi¬¬fi¬cantly more energy during the first 100 days after calving than they can take in with their feed. "This imbalance can result in fat and muscle wasting as well as metabolic diseases," said veterinary Dr. Susanne Plattes, CIDRe Coordinator. High-performance cows are more susceptible to fertility problems or hoof and udder infections. Dr. Plattes explained further, "The animals' wellness is becoming the focus for ethical and eco¬n¬omic reasons. If more species-appropriate animal husbandry results in better products, the economic advantages will also be obvious."
Environmental consequences

The environmental effects of modern milk production are also tangible. Gases that further stoke global climate change can escape from dairy cows' stomachs. Consequently, the central question the researchers involved with the CIDRe, who come from Agricultural Science, IT, Physics, Veterinary Medicine, Economics and Social Sciences, are seeking to answer is how the complex dairy industry system can be brought into balance. In addition to mere milk production, both the health and wellness of the animals, as well as the protection of the environment should be taken into account. Related to this are socioeconomic questions; such as, how highly - in terms of price - consumers value a sustainable dairy industry.

Unique research project at the Frankenforst research station

First, however, lots of data must be collected in order to be able to optimize the dairy industry system also with regard to animal wellness and environmental protection. Here, the Frankenforst research station of the University of Bonn plays a central role in this research area. "It is the only one of its kind in Germany and allows research at the highest level," said Prof. Büscher. So for example, a host of sensors captures how much feed a cow eats and how much she moves. Water intake, milk flow and ingredients as well as heart frequency are among the parameters that are recorded digitally, based on which the scientists can determine how each individual cow is doing. The animals' behavior is analyzed in cooperation with the University of Halle-Wittenberg.

Comprehensive measured data for a simulation model
The scientists want to capture the dairy industry system as completely as possible and then develop models from their results. "This will allow us to answer several critical questions," said Dr. Plattes. "Such as solutions for the trade-off between more freedom to move and the related increase in ammonia and odor emissions." In addition, the scientists are interested in finding out whether there is an increased health risk an increased health risk for cows with high milk production. But economic issues are also studied, such as the difference in dairy animal husbandry profitability on field versus pasture locations.
Support for young scholars

"Over the past years, interdisciplinary cooperation in diary industry research at the Agricultural Faculty has been intensified greatly," said the Dean, Prof. Dr. Karl Schellander. "CIDRe will focus the strengths of the participants involved in this research focus, intensify interdisciplinary research and contribute to increasing its visibility here and abroad." Another focus of the Center is supporting young scholars - among others, by means of the Theodor-Brinkmann Graduate School that offers both the Faculty's Master courses of study as well as its structured doctoral studies, all under one roof. In addition, the CIDRe is scheduled to offer an interdisciplinary Summer School.

Contact:

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Büscher (Speaker)
CIDRe (Center of Integrated Dairy Research)
Ph.: +49 228-732 396
Email: buescher@uni-bonn.de

Dr. med. vet. Susanne Plattes (Coordinator)
CIDRe (Center of Integrated Dairy Research)
Ph.: +49 228-739 418 or +49 6552-600 9915
Email: cidre@uni-bonn.de

Johannes Seiler | idw
Further information:
http://www.cidre.uni-bonn.de/
http://www3.uni-bonn.de/Pressemitteilungen/058-2012

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Improving artichoke root development, transplant quality
21.07.2016 | American Society for Horticultural Science

nachricht Genome of 6,000-year-old barley grains sequenced for first time
19.07.2016 | Leibniz-Institut für Pflanzengenetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Forschen in 15 Kilometern Höhe - Einsatz des Flugzeuges HALO wird weiter gefördert

Das moderne Höhen-Forschungsflugzeug HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) wird auch in Zukunft für Projekte zur Atmosphären- und Erdsystemforschung eingesetzt werden können: Die Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) bewilligte jetzt Fördergelder von mehr als 11 Millionen Euro für die nächste Phase des HALO Schwerpunktprogramms (SPP 1294) in den kommenden drei Jahren. Die Universität Leipzig ist neben der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main und der Technischen Universität Dresden federführend bei diesem DFG-Schwerpunktprogramm.

Die Universität Leipzig wird von der Fördersumme knapp 6 Millionen Euro zur Durchführung von zwei Forschungsprojekten mit HALO sowie zur Deckung der hohen...

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Rekord in der Hochdruckforschung: 1 Terapascal erstmals erreicht und überschritten

Einem internationalen Forschungsteam um Prof. Dr. Natalia Dubrovinskaia und Prof. Dr. Leonid Dubrovinsky von der Universität Bayreuth ist es erstmals gelungen, im Labor einen Druck von 1 Terapascal (= 1.000.000.000.000 Pascal) zu erzeugen. Dieser Druck ist dreimal höher als der Druck, der im Zentrum der Erde herrscht. Die in 'Science Advances' veröffentlichte Studie eröffnet neue Forschungsmöglichkeiten für die Physik und Chemie der Festkörper, die Materialwissenschaft, die Geophysik und die Astrophysik.

Extreme Drücke und Temperaturen, die im Labor mit hoher Präzision erzeugt und kontrolliert werden, sind ideale Voraussetzungen für die Physik, Chemie und...

Im Focus: Graphen von der Rolle: Serienfertigung von Elektronik aus 2D-Nanomaterialien

Graphen, Kohlenstoff in zweidimensionaler Struktur, wird seit seiner Entdeckung im Jahr 2004 als ein möglicher Werkstoff der Zukunft gehandelt: Sein geringes Gewicht, die extreme Festigkeit, vor allem aber seine hohe thermische und elektrische Leitfähigkeit wecken Hoffnungen, Graphen bald für vollkommen neue Geräte und Technologien einsetzen zu können. Einen ersten Schritt gehen jetzt die Forscher im EU-Forschungsprojekt »HEA2D«: Ziel ist es, das 2D-Nanomaterial von einer Kupferfolie durch ein Rolle-zu-Rolle-Verfahren auf Kunststofffolien und -bauteile zu übertragen. Auf diese Weise soll eine Serienfertigung elektronischer und opto-elektronischer Komponenten auf Graphenbasis möglich werden.

Besonders interessiert an hochleistungsfähiger Elektronik aus 2D-Materialien ist die Automobilindustrie, die diese in Schaltern mit transparenten Leiterbahnen,...

Im Focus: Menschen können einzelnes Photon sehen

Forscher am Wiener Institut für Molekulare Pathologie (IMP) und an der Rockefeller University in New York wiesen erstmals nach, dass Menschen ein einzelnes Photon wahrnehmen können. Für ihre Experimente verwendeten sie eine Quanten-Lichtquelle und kombinierten sie mit einem ausgeklügelten psycho-physikalischen Ansatz. Das Wissenschaftsjournal “Nature Communications” veröffentlicht die Ergebnisse in seiner aktuellen Ausgabe.

Trotz zahreicher Studien, die seit über siebig Jahren zu diesem Thema durchgeführt wurden, konnte die absolute Untergrenze der menschlichen Sehfähigkeit bisher...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Kongress für Molekulare Medizin: Krankheiten interdisziplinär verstehen und behandeln

20.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Ultraschnelle Kalorimetrie: Gesellschaft für thermische Analyse GEFTA lädt zur Jahrestagung

19.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Das neue Präventionsgesetz aktiv gestalten

19.07.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Eine Kamera für unsichtbare Felder

22.07.2016 | Physik Astronomie

3-D-Analyse von Materialien: Saarbrücker Forscher erhält renommierten US-Preis für sein Lebenswerk

22.07.2016 | Förderungen Preise

Signale der Hirnflüssigkeit steuern das Verhalten von Stammzellen im Gehirn

22.07.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie