Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 


Natural pesticide protects cattle against ticks in Africa

Cattle are extremely vulnerable to ticks, mites and flies which can transmit blood parasites, cause irritating wounds and then infections. In order to control them farmers must dip their cattle in a pesticide. This is impractical and expensive for poor farmers with just a small number of livestock.

A solution may lie in the perennial plant, Lippia javanica, widely consumed to alleviate symptoms of fever is also used by some farmers to make a pesticide. The University of Greenwich team in collaboration with the University of Zimbabwe, pulped and soaked the Lippia leaves in water to produce an extract which could be sprayed on cattle. Varying concentrations were tried to discover the best application method and the level of protection provided by the plant extract.

The research was led by Phil Stevenson, Professor of Plant Chemistry and Dr Steven Belmain, Ecologist, from the Agriculture, Health & Environment Department at the Natural Resources Institute (NRI). Professor Phil Stevenson says: “When used at the correct dosage, Lippia javanica proved to be almost as effective as the industrial pesticides used for tick control.”

The shrub’s leaves can easily be harvested from abundant bushes in the wild and can also be easily grown from seed. Therefore, farmers need think only about the time it takes them to harvest and prepare the Lippia extract as opposed to buying expensive commercial synthetic products.

Further work is being carried out to refine the extraction of the active ingredients of the plant and optimise application on the lower parts of the animal where the ticks usually attach themselves.

The work is part of the EU funded African Dryland Alliance for Pesticidal Plant Technologies (ADAPPT) project led by NRI, together with partners including the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and non-governmental organisations, agricultural institutes, ministries and universities from eight African countries.

The project is carrying out research into the use of plants as environmentally benign and safer alternatives to synthetic pesticides. It is examining roots, leaves, seeds, and flowers requiring only basic preparation which farmers can use to reduce field crop damage, stored product losses and livestock illness or mortality.

ADAPPT also seeks to establish a network for promoting and improving the use of indigenous botanical knowledge for food security and poverty alleviation in Africa.

For more information see the project website at

To learn more about the University of Greenwich’s Natural Resources Institute see

Nick Davison | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Harnessing a peptide holds promise for increasing crop yields without more fertilizer
25.11.2015 | University of Massachusetts at Amherst

nachricht Study shows how crop prices and climate variables affect yield and acreage
18.11.2015 | University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Innovative Photovoltaik – vom Labor an die Fassade

Fraunhofer ISE demonstriert neue Zell- und Modultechnologien an der Außenfassade eines Laborgebäudes

Das Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE hat die Außenfassade eines seiner Laborgebäude mit 70 Photovoltaik-Modulen ausgerüstet. Die Module...

Im Focus: Innovative Photovoltaics – from the Lab to the Façade

Fraunhofer ISE Demonstrates New Cell and Module Technologies on its Outer Building Façade

The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE has installed 70 photovoltaic modules on the outer façade of one of its lab buildings. The modules were...

Im Focus: Follow Me: Forscher der Jacobs University steuern Unterwasser-Roboter erstmals durch Zeichensprache

Normalerweise werden Unterwasser-Roboter über lange Kabel von Booten oder von Land aus gesteuert. Forschern der Jacobs University in Bremen ist nun ein Durchbruch in der Mensch-Maschine-Kommunikation gelungen: Erstmals konnten sie einen Unterwasser-Roboter mit Hilfe von Gesten navigieren. Eine spezielle Kamera half dabei, die Zeichensprache in Befehle umzusetzen. Die Feldtests fanden im Rahmen des EU-geförderten Projektes CADDY „Cognitive Autonomous Diving buddy“ statt.

Archäologische Untersuchungen im Ozean und vergleichbare komplexe Forschungsprojekte unter Wasser sind auf die Unterstützung von Robotern angewiesen, um in...

Im Focus: Lactate for Brain Energy

Nerve cells cover their high energy demand with glucose and lactate. Scientists of the University of Zurich now provide new support for this. They show for the first time in the intact mouse brain evidence for an exchange of lactate between different brain cells. With this study they were able to confirm a 20-year old hypothesis.

In comparison to other organs, the human brain has the highest energy requirements. The supply of energy for nerve cells and the particular role of lactic acid...

Im Focus: Laser-Prozesssimulation erstmals auch als App verfügbar

Die Simulation von Prozessen bei der Lasermaterialbearbeitung ist in den letzten Jahren immer besser geworden. Die Software kann heute relativ gut voraussagen, was am Werkstück passiert. Leider ist sie hochkomplex und erfordert viel Rechenzeit. Durch eine clevere Vereinfachung können Experten vom Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT erstmals eine Simulationssoftware anbieten, die Prozesse in Echtzeit rechnet und auch auf Tablets oder Smartphones läuft. Mit der schnellen Software lassen sich teure Versuche einsparen und noch besser optimale Prozessparameter finden.

Eine verlässliche Simulation von Laserprozessen war bislang eine Sache für Experten. Mit ausgefeilten Software-Paketen und viel Zeit auf Computerclustern...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>



im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics

Fraunhofer-Kongress »Urban Futures«: 2 Tage in der Stadt der Zukunft

25.11.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Internationale Mechatronik-Konferenz "REM2015" in Bochum

25.11.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Tagung über CFK-Bearbeitung geht in sechste Runde

25.11.2015 | Veranstaltungen

Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Biophysik - Turbulente Bakterien

25.11.2015 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Herbst-Stürme bringen erneut Salz in die Ostsee: Dritter Salzwassereinbruch in 1,5 Jahren

25.11.2015 | Geowissenschaften

Einblicke in die „dunkle Zone“

25.11.2015 | Biowissenschaften Chemie