Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

The World´s Thinnest Ratchet - Publication in “Nature Nanotechnology”

20.02.2013
A ratchet supports one-way traffic. One can pull it back and forth, but it only moves forwards. Mechanical ratchets, used to pull or hold heavy objects, are familiar examples. Also, some electronic devices are based on ratchets.

Transistors are made out of diodes, which rectify electrical currents: however hard one pushes electrons in both directions, they flow only in one. Now an international consortium consisting of research groups from Germany, Russia, Sweden, and the U.S., led by the experimental group of Prof. Dr. Sergey Ganichev from the University of Regensburg and supported by the theoretical group of Prof. Dr. Sergey Tarasenko (St. Petersburg) and Prof. Dr. Jaroslav Fabian (Regensburg), has demonstrated that electronic ratchets can be successfully scaled down to one-atom thick layers.

The researchers showed that graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, supports a ratchet motion of electrons when placed in a magnetic field. They applied terahertz laser fields to push the electrons back and forth, while the magnetic field acted as a valve to let only those electrons moving in one direction go on, stopping the others. The results of the research group are reported in an issue of “Nature Nanotechnology” (DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2012.231).

Graphene may be the ultimate electronic material, possibly replacing silicon in electronic devices in the future. It has attracted worldwide attention from physicists, chemists, and engineers. Its discoverers, A. Geim and K. Novoselov, were awarded the physics Nobel Prize for it in 2010. The discovery of the ratchet motion in graphene greatly adds to the technological potential of this material and to the prospects of further miniaturization of electronic devices. Before carbon based electronics might take over from silicon many fundamental physical challenges need to be addressed.

In Regensburg, research activities on graphene are embedded in larger research programs, funded by the German Science Foundation (DFG). These are a PhD program on carbon based electronics (DFG-Research Training Group GRK 1570, spokesperson: Prof. Dr. Milena Grifoni) and a Collaborative Research Center (SFB 689, spokesperson: Prof. Dr. Dieter Weiss) funding more than 40 PhD students, as well as projects within a DFG Priority Programm (SPP 1459, spokesperson: Prof. Dr. Thomas Seyller, Chemnitz). The international cooperation on terahertz physics and technology is coordinated by the Regensburg Terahertz Center (TerZ, directed by Prof. Dr. Sergey Ganichev), also funded by the International Bureau of the German Ministry of Education and Research.

Title of the article in “Nature Nanotechnology”:
C. Drexler, S. Tarasenko, P. Olbrich, J. Karch, M. Hirmer, F. Müller, M. Gmitra, J. Fabian, R. Yakimova, S. Lara-Avila, S. Kubatkin, M. Wang, R. Vajtai, P. Ajayan, J. Kono, and S.D. Ganichev: Magnetic quantum ratchet effect in graphene, Nature Nanotechnology (DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2012.231).
More information on the research activities on grapheme in Regensburg:
www.physik.uni-regensburg.de/forschung/gk_carbonano/
www-app.uni-regensburg.de/Fakultaeten/Physik/sfb689/
www.spp1459.uni-erlangen.de/about-spp-1459/
Press Contact:
Prof. Dr. Sergey Ganichev
Universität Regensburg
Faculty of Physics
TerZ – Regensburg Terahertz Center
Tel.: +49 (0)941 943-2050
Sergey.Ganichev@physik.uni-regensburg.de

Alexander Schlaak | idw
Further information:
http://www.physik.uni-regensburg.de/TerZ/

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Streamlining accelerated computing for industry
24.08.2016 | DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

nachricht Lehigh engineer discovers a high-speed nano-avalanche
24.08.2016 | Lehigh University

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Streamlining accelerated computing for industry

PyFR code combines high accuracy with flexibility to resolve unsteady turbulence problems

Scientists and engineers striving to create the next machine-age marvel--whether it be a more aerodynamic rocket, a faster race car, or a higher-efficiency jet...

Im Focus: Neues DFKI-Projekt SELFIE schlägt innovativen Weg in der Verifikation cyber-physischer Systeme ein

Vor der Markteinführung müssen neue Computersysteme auf ihre Korrektheit überprüft werden. Jedoch ist eine vollständige Verifikation aufgrund der Komplexität heutiger Rechner aus Zeitgründen oft nicht möglich. Im nun gestarteten Projekt SELFIE verfolgt der Forschungsbereich Cyber-Physical Systems des Deutschen Forschungszentrums für Künstliche Intelligenz (DFKI) unter Leitung von Prof. Dr. Rolf Drechsler einen grundlegend neuen Ansatz, der es Systemen ermöglicht, sich nach der Produktion und Auslieferung selbst zu verifizieren. Das Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) unterstützt das Vorhaben über drei Jahre mit einer Fördersumme von 1,4 Millionen Euro.

In den letzten Jahrzehnten wurden enorme Fortschritte in der Computertechnik erzielt. Ergebnis dieser Entwicklung sind eingebettete und cyber-physische...

Im Focus: „Künstliches Atom“ in Graphen-Schicht

Elektronen offenbaren ihre Quanteneigenschaften, wenn man sie in engen Bereichen gefangen hält. Ein Forschungsteam mit TU Wien-Beteiligung baut Elektronen-Gefängnisse in Graphen.

Wenn man Elektronen in einem engen Gefängnis einsperrt, dann benehmen sie sich ganz anders als im freien Raum. Ähnlich wie die Elektronen in einem Atom können...

Im Focus: X-ray optics on a chip

Waveguides are widely used for filtering, confining, guiding, coupling or splitting beams of visible light. However, creating waveguides that could do the same for X-rays has posed tremendous challenges in fabrication, so they are still only in an early stage of development.

In the latest issue of Acta Crystallographica Section A: Foundations and Advances , Sarah Hoffmann-Urlaub and Tim Salditt report the fabrication and testing of...

Im Focus: Quanten-Jonglieren mit freien Elektronen

Göttinger Wissenschaftler manipulieren Quantenzustand freier Elektronen mit Lichtfeldern

In der klassischen Physik kann ein Elektron nur eine einzige, bestimmte Geschwindigkeit annehmen. Quantenmechanisch ist es jedoch möglich, dass es sich in...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

HTW Berlin richtet im September die 30. EnviroInfo aus

23.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

micro photonics mit Kurs auf Premiere in Berlin

22.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

„BirdNumbers 2016“ - 300 Ornithologen kommen zu internationaler Tagung an die Uni Halle

22.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Verschlüsse von Blutgefäßen: Wissenschaftler klären Mechanismus der zellulären Selbstheilung auf

24.08.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie

Atomare Strukturen von Proteinen aufgeklärt: Biophysiker Adam Lange ausgezeichnet

24.08.2016 | Förderungen Preise

Schatz an der Küste als UN-Dekade Projekt Biologische Vielfalt ausgezeichnet

24.08.2016 | Förderungen Preise