Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Illuminating the no-man's land of waters' surface

27.11.2012
Researcher at EPFL proves that the strong electric charge observed at the interface between oil and water is not due to impurities

Water repelling molecules are said to be hydrophobic. The hydration – or formation of water interfaces around hydrophobic molecules – is important for many biological processes: protein folding, membrane formation, transport of proteins across an interface, the transmission of action potentials across membranes. It is involved as well in the process of creating mayonnaise, or in the fact that you can get rid of fat with soap. Hydrophobic interfaces although long studied, are poorly understood.


Nonlinear optics and light diffusion allow to see the unseeable.

Credit: © 2012 EPFL

Here's an amusing kitchen-table experiment to illustrate waters unusual properties: put a drop of pure insulating oil in a glass of pure, non-conducting water, and create an electric field using two wires hooked up to a battery. You'll see the oil move from the negative to the positive pole of the little circuit you've created. You have created charge in a mixture that was neutral, and a huge amount of it too, judging from the speed at which the droplets move. The same thing happens for gas bubbles in water; the phenomenon of charging applies to all hydrophobic/water interfaces.

- A century of debates -

It's not a new discovery; scientists have observed the phenomenon in the middle of the 19th century. But despite more than a century of research, the reason why such a huge electric charge exists is still the subject of heated debate.

In an article published this week in Angewandte Chemie – a journal of reference in the field – EPFL scientist Sylvie Roke challenges a hypothesis put forward last spring in the same journal. With experimental proof to back her up, the holder of the Julia Jacobi chair in photomedicine makes her case: the phenomenon is not caused by the inevitable "impurities" present in oils, as her colleagues claim, but rather by certain intrinsic properties of the water molecules involved.

- Show the unseeable -
For proof, Roke turns to the technologies in which she is an expert – nonlinear optics and light diffusion. Using carefully filtered lasers channeled through a complex circuit of mirrors and lenses, she "hits" her sample – barely a drop – and measures the wavelength of the light that escapes from it. With this she can detect whether or not there are nanoscopic molecules on the interface between the oil and the water.

The precision of the observations "shows that negative charges exist even in a total absence of surface impurities, and thus the explanation put forward by my colleagues, which was derived from charge measurements and chemical titrations of the bulk liquids, doesn't hold up," says Roke. "We have developed a unique apparatus that can distinctly measure the interfacial structure of a layer on the sub-nanometer length scale that surrounds a droplet of oil in water. Thus, we can 'see' what is on the interface, and do not have to deduce it from comparing bulk properties, which is far less accurate."

Disproving a hypothesis isn't enough to explain a phenomenon, however. Roke is studying a promising avenue, that explores the intrinsic quantum nature of the water molecule itself, which might be responsible for the phenomenon. "The measurements we've made as part of this refutation could be used to try and prove this explanation," she says. "It's fascinating, because quantum effects (the smallest of the smallest) might be responsible for macroscopic charging effects that influence so many properties that relate to the functioning of the human body."

Sylvie Roke | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.epfl.ch

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Streamlining accelerated computing for industry
24.08.2016 | DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

nachricht Lehigh engineer discovers a high-speed nano-avalanche
24.08.2016 | Lehigh University

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Flexibel statt starr

Gezielter und effizienter Transport zellulärer Frachten durch physikalischen Mechanismus

Damit Zellen richtig funktionieren können, müssen Frachten innerhalb der Zelle ständig von einem Ort zum anderen transportiert werden, wobei es ähnlich zugeht...

Im Focus: Elektronen am Tempolimit

Elektronische Bauteile werden seit Jahren immer schneller und machen damit leistungsfähige Computer und andere Technologien möglich. Wie schnell sich Elektronen mit elektrischen Feldern letztendlich kontrollieren lassen, haben jetzt Forscher an der ETH Zürich untersucht. Ihre Erkenntnisse sind wichtig für die Petahertz-Elektronik der Zukunft.

Geschwindigkeit mag keine Hexerei sein, doch sie ist die Grundlage für Technologien, die nicht selten wie Magie anmuten. Moderne Computer etwa sind so...

Im Focus: Forscher beobachten, wie Chaperone defekte Proteine erkennen

Proteine, auch Eiweiße genannt, erfüllen in unserem Körper lebenswichtige Funktionen: Sie transportieren Stoffe, bekämpfen Krankheitserreger oder fungieren als Katalysatoren. Damit diese Prozesse zuverlässig funktionieren, müssen die Proteine eine definierte dreidimensionale Struktur annehmen. Molekulare Faltungshelfer, die sogenannten Chaperone, kontrollieren den Strukturierungsprozess. Ein Forscherteam unter der Beteiligung der Technischen Universität München (TUM) konnte nun herausfinden, wie Chaperone besonders gefährliche Fehler in diesem Strukturierungsprozess erkennen. Die Ergebnisse wurden im Fachmagazin "Molecular Cell" veröffentlicht.

Chaperone sind sozusagen die TÜV-Prüfer der Zelle. Es handelt sich um Proteine, die wiederum andere Proteine auf Qualitätsmängel untersuchen, bevor diese die...

Im Focus: Mikroskopieren mit einzelnen Ionen

Neuartiges Ionenmikroskop nutzt einzelne Ionen, um Abbildungen mit einer Auflösung im Nanometerbereich zu erzeugen

Wissenschaftler um Georg Jacob von der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz haben ein Ionenmikroskop entwickelt, das nur mit exakt einem Ion pro Bildpixel...

Im Focus: Streamlining accelerated computing for industry

PyFR code combines high accuracy with flexibility to resolve unsteady turbulence problems

Scientists and engineers striving to create the next machine-age marvel--whether it be a more aerodynamic rocket, a faster race car, or a higher-efficiency jet...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

VDE und IEEE veranstalten Weltkongress der Consumer-Elektronik auf der IFA

26.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

IT-Sicherheit – Wettlauf gegen die Zeit

26.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Neue Ideen für die Schifffahrt

24.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Geothermieforschung: Bund fördert Projekt am Drilling Simulator Celle mit 3,8 Millionen Euro

26.08.2016 | Förderungen Preise

VDE und IEEE veranstalten Weltkongress der Consumer-Elektronik auf der IFA

26.08.2016 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Körperwärme als Stromquelle

26.08.2016 | Materialwissenschaften