Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

A microquasar makes a giant manatee nebula

21.01.2013
A new view of a 20,000-year old supernova remnant demonstrates the upgraded imaging power of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and provides more clues to the history of this giant cloud that resembles a beloved endangered species, the Florida Manatee.

W50 is one of the largest supernova remnants ever viewed by the VLA. At nearly 700 light years across, it covers two degrees on the sky – that's the span of four full Moons!


The National Radio Astronomy Observatory has adopted a new nickname for W50 of "The Manatee Nebula," because the likeness between it and a resting Florida Manatee is too uncanny to ignore. Left: The W50 supernova remnant in radio (green) glows against the infrared background of stars and dust (red). Right: A Florida Manatee rests underwater in Three Sisters Springs in Crystal River, Florida.

Credit: Left: NSF's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), NRAO/AUI/NSF, K. Golap, M. Goss; NASA’s Wide Field Survey Explorer (WISE). Right: Tracy Colson

Turbulent History

The enormous W50 cloud formed when a giant star, 18,000 light years away in the constellation of Aquila, exploded as a supernova around twenty thousand years ago, sending its outer gases flying outward in an expanding bubble.

The remaining, gravitationally-crushed relic of that giant star, most likely a black hole, feeds on gas from a very close, companion star. The cannibalized gas collects in a disk around the black hole. The disk and black hole's network of powerful magnetic field lines acts like an enormous railroad system to snag charged particles out of the disk and channel them outward in powerful jets traveling at nearly the speed of light. This system of a black hole and its feeder star shines brightly in both radio waves and X-rays and is known collectively as the SS433 microquasar.

Over time, the microquasar's jets have forced their way through the expanding gases of the W50 bubble, eventually punching bulges outward on either side. The jets also wobble, like an unstable spinning top, and blaze vivid corkscrew patterns across the inflating bulges.

New Namesake

Optically bright astronomical objects, those visible to the eye and optical telescopes, often are nicknamed for their earthly likenesses, such as the Whirlpool Galaxy and Owl Nebula. Invisible W50 comes by its less catchy name by being the 50th radio source listed in the Westerhout Catalog, assembled in 1958 by Dutch astronomer, Gart Westerhout.

When the VLA's giant W50 image reached the NRAO Director's office, Heidi Winter, the Director's Executive Assistant, saw the likeness to a manatee, the endangered marine mammals known as "sea cows" that congregate in warm waters in the southeastern United States.

Florida Manatees are gentle giants that average around 10 feet long, weigh over 1000 pounds, and spend up to eight hours a day grazing on sea plants. They occupy the remainder of their day resting, often on their backs with their flippers crossed over their large bellies, in a pose closely resembling W50.

Dangerous encounters with boat propellers injure many of these curious herbivores, giving them deep, curved scars similar in appearance to the arcs made by the powerful jets on the large W50 remnant.

Thanks to Ms. Winter's suggestion, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory has adopted a new nickname for W50: The Manatee Nebula. In collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the NRAO will unveil the Manatee Nebula to the public during the annual Manatee Festival in Crystal River, Florida on a stage overlooking the largest natural concentration of wintering manatees in the world.

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

Tania Burchell | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nrao.edu

Further reports about: Astronomy Astronomy Observatory NRAO Observatory VLA black hole nebula optical telescope

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Streamlining accelerated computing for industry
24.08.2016 | DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

nachricht Lehigh engineer discovers a high-speed nano-avalanche
24.08.2016 | Lehigh University

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Flexibel statt starr

Gezielter und effizienter Transport zellulärer Frachten durch physikalischen Mechanismus

Damit Zellen richtig funktionieren können, müssen Frachten innerhalb der Zelle ständig von einem Ort zum anderen transportiert werden, wobei es ähnlich zugeht...

Im Focus: Elektronen am Tempolimit

Elektronische Bauteile werden seit Jahren immer schneller und machen damit leistungsfähige Computer und andere Technologien möglich. Wie schnell sich Elektronen mit elektrischen Feldern letztendlich kontrollieren lassen, haben jetzt Forscher an der ETH Zürich untersucht. Ihre Erkenntnisse sind wichtig für die Petahertz-Elektronik der Zukunft.

Geschwindigkeit mag keine Hexerei sein, doch sie ist die Grundlage für Technologien, die nicht selten wie Magie anmuten. Moderne Computer etwa sind so...

Im Focus: Forscher beobachten, wie Chaperone defekte Proteine erkennen

Proteine, auch Eiweiße genannt, erfüllen in unserem Körper lebenswichtige Funktionen: Sie transportieren Stoffe, bekämpfen Krankheitserreger oder fungieren als Katalysatoren. Damit diese Prozesse zuverlässig funktionieren, müssen die Proteine eine definierte dreidimensionale Struktur annehmen. Molekulare Faltungshelfer, die sogenannten Chaperone, kontrollieren den Strukturierungsprozess. Ein Forscherteam unter der Beteiligung der Technischen Universität München (TUM) konnte nun herausfinden, wie Chaperone besonders gefährliche Fehler in diesem Strukturierungsprozess erkennen. Die Ergebnisse wurden im Fachmagazin "Molecular Cell" veröffentlicht.

Chaperone sind sozusagen die TÜV-Prüfer der Zelle. Es handelt sich um Proteine, die wiederum andere Proteine auf Qualitätsmängel untersuchen, bevor diese die...

Im Focus: Mikroskopieren mit einzelnen Ionen

Neuartiges Ionenmikroskop nutzt einzelne Ionen, um Abbildungen mit einer Auflösung im Nanometerbereich zu erzeugen

Wissenschaftler um Georg Jacob von der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz haben ein Ionenmikroskop entwickelt, das nur mit exakt einem Ion pro Bildpixel...

Im Focus: Streamlining accelerated computing for industry

PyFR code combines high accuracy with flexibility to resolve unsteady turbulence problems

Scientists and engineers striving to create the next machine-age marvel--whether it be a more aerodynamic rocket, a faster race car, or a higher-efficiency jet...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

VDE und IEEE veranstalten Weltkongress der Consumer-Elektronik auf der IFA

26.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

IT-Sicherheit – Wettlauf gegen die Zeit

26.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Neue Ideen für die Schifffahrt

24.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Geothermieforschung: Bund fördert Projekt am Drilling Simulator Celle mit 3,8 Millionen Euro

26.08.2016 | Förderungen Preise

VDE und IEEE veranstalten Weltkongress der Consumer-Elektronik auf der IFA

26.08.2016 | Veranstaltungsnachrichten

Körperwärme als Stromquelle

26.08.2016 | Materialwissenschaften