Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Building healthy bones takes guts

15.02.2013
In what could be an early step toward new treatments for people with osteoporosis, scientists at Michigan State University report that a natural probiotic supplement can help male mice produce healthier bones.
Interestingly, the same can’t be said for female mice, the researchers report in the Journal of Cellular Physiology.

“We know that inflammation in the gut can cause bone loss, though it’s unclear exactly why,” said lead author Laura McCabe, a professor in MSU’s departments of Physiology and Radiology. “The neat thing we found is that a probiotic can enhance bone density.”

Probiotics are microorganisms that can help balance the immune system. For the study, the researchers fed the mice Lactobacillus reuteri, a probiotic known to reduce inflammation, a sometimes harmful effect of the body’s immune response to infection.

“Through food fermentation, we’ve been eating bacteria that we classify as probiotics for thousands of years,” said co-author Robert Britton, associate professor in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics. “There’s evidence that this bacterium as a species has co-evolved with humans. It’s indigenous to our intestinal tracts and is something that, if missing, might cause problems.”

In the study, the male mice showed a significant increase in bone density after four weeks of treatment. There was no such effect when the researchers repeated the experiment with female mice, an anomaly they’re now investigating.

By 2020, half of all Americans over 50 are expected to have low bone density or osteoporosis, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. About one in two women and one in four men over 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis.

Drugs to prevent bone loss in osteoporosis patients are already in wide use, but over the long term they can disrupt the natural remodeling of bone tissue and could potentially have negative side effects that include unusual bone fractures and joint and muscle pain.

McCabe and Britton are quick to point out that this line of research is in its early stages and that results in mice don’t always translate to humans. But they’re hopeful the new study could point the way toward osteoporosis drugs that aren’t saddled with such side effects, especially for people who lose bone density from an early age because of another chronic condition.

“People tend to think of osteoporosis as just affecting postmenopausal women, but what they don’t realize is that it can occur with other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and Type 1 diabetes,” she said. “You don’t want to put your child on medications that reduce bone remodeling for the rest of their life, so something natural could be useful for long-term treatment of bone loss that begins at childhood.”

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and MSU. Research assistants Regina Irwin and Laura Schaefer co-authored the paper.

Andy McGlashen | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.msu.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Custom-tailored strategy against glioblastomas
26.09.2016 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht New leukemia treatment offers hope
23.09.2016 | King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Forscher entwickeln quantenphotonischen Schaltkreis mit elektrischer Lichtquelle

Optische Quantenrechner könnten die Computertechnologie revolutionieren. Forschern um Wolfram Pernice von der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität Münster sowie Ralph Krupke, Manfred Kappes und Carsten Rockstuhl vom Karlsruher Institut für Technologie ist es nun gelungen, einen quantenoptischen Versuchsaufbau auf einem Chip zu platzieren. Damit haben sie eine Voraussetzung erfüllt, um photonische Schaltkreise für optische Quantencomputer nutzbar machen zu können.

Ob für eine abhörsichere Datenverschlüsselung, die ultraschnelle Berechnung riesiger Datenmengen oder die sogenannte Quantensimulation, mit der hochkomplexe...

Im Focus: First quantum photonic circuit with electrically driven light source

Optical quantum computers can revolutionize computer technology. A team of researchers led by scientists from Münster University and KIT now succeeded in putting a quantum optical experimental set-up onto a chip. In doing so, they have met one of the requirements for making it possible to use photonic circuits for optical quantum computers.

Optical quantum computers are what people are pinning their hopes on for tomorrow’s computer technology – whether for tap-proof data encryption, ultrafast...

Im Focus: Quantenboost für künstliche Intelligenz

Intelligente Maschinen, die selbständig lernen, gelten als Zukunftstrend. Forscher der Universität Innsbruck und des Joint Quantum Institute in Maryland, USA, loten nun in der Fachzeitschrift Physical Review Letters aus, wie Quantentechnologien dabei helfen können, die Methoden des maschinellen Lernens weiter zu verbessern.

In selbstfahrenden Autos, IBM's Watson oder Google's AlphaGo sind Computerprogramme am Werk, die aus Erfahrungen lernen können. Solche Maschinen werden im Zuge...

Im Focus: Synthese-chemischer Meilenstein: Neues Ferrocenium-Molekül entdeckt

Wissenschaftler der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) haben zusammen mit Kollegen der Freien Universität Berlin ein neues Molekül entdeckt: Die Eisenverbindung in der seltenen Oxidationsstufe +4 gehört zu den Ferrocenen und ist äußerst schwierig zu synthetisieren.

Metallocene werden umgangssprachlich auch als Sandwichverbindungen bezeichnet. Sie bestehen aus zwei organischen ringförmigen Verbindungen, den...

Im Focus: Neue Entwicklungen in der Asphären-Messtechnik

Kompetenzzentrum Ultrapräzise Oberflächenbearbeitung (CC UPOB) lädt zum Expertentreffen im März 2017 ein

Ob in Weltraumteleskopen, deren Optiken trotz großer Abmessungen nanometergenau gefertigt sein müssen, in Handykameras oder in Endoskopen − Asphären kommen in...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

Laser für Neurochirurgie und Biofabrikation - LaserForum 2016 thematisiert Medizintechnik

27.09.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Ist Vergessen die Zukunft?

27.09.2016 | Veranstaltungen

Von der Probe zum digitalen Modell - MikroskopieTrends ´16

26.09.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Nanotechnologie für Energie-Materialien: Elektroden wie Blattadern

27.09.2016 | Physik Astronomie

Ultradünne Membranen aus Graphen

27.09.2016 | Physik Astronomie

Ein magnetischer Antrieb für Mikroroboter

27.09.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie