Forum für Wissenschaft, Industrie und Wirtschaft

Hauptsponsoren:     3M 
Datenbankrecherche:

 

Many ways to grow

25.05.2009
Environmental conditions may determine which particular process plants will use to build an essential hormone

For the better part of a century, scientists have recognized indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), one of several hormones known as auxins, as one of the most important drivers of plant growth and development. However, it remains unclear exactly how IAA is synthesized. Previous research has identified at least four different enzymatic ‘assembly lines’ that may be involved in its production, and each of these pathways generates chemical compounds that are potential precursors to IAA, as well as a number of other biologically important molecules involved in protecting plants against predators and pathogens.

In the thale cress plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, indole-3-actaldoxime (IAOx) is thought to represent a likely intermediate compound in IAA production via two of these candidate pathways, CYP79B and YUC. In order to clarify which of these contribute primarily to production of IAOx and IAA, Hiroyuki Kasahara of the RIKEN Plant Science Center in Yokohama and colleagues generated several mutant Arabidopsis strains in which key enzymes in either pathway had been ablated.

From the data, the team consistently identified an exclusive role for the CYP79B pathway in IAOx production and—by extension—IAA synthesis, and demonstrated no effect on levels of either compound resulting from interference with YUC-associated enzymes1. They also identified two compounds, indole-3-acetamide and indole-3-acetonitrile, as likely intermediates in the conversion of IAOx to IAA. Many plant species, including tobacco and rice, lack the CYP79B pathway altogether and do not produce detectable IAOx. However, these plants do produce these other IAA intermediates, suggesting the existence of yet-unidentified, parallel biosynthetic pathways in these species.

These findings indicate the need for a considerable reorganization of existing models of plant hormone synthesis. “Before this research, three proposed pathways were thought to converge at IAOx or its metabolites,” says Kasahara. “We have clearly separated these pathways.” Interestingly, their data also revealed that even in Arabidopsis, CYP79B does not represent the primary pathway of IAA production; instead, it is simply one of several that appear to contribute under different, specific conditions—in this case, cultivation at higher than room temperature.

Other non-IAOx biosynthetic pathways appear to be common to most plant species and Kasahara and colleagues now hope to clarify their independent contributions to overall IAA production. “We do not know why plants have so many biosynthetic pathways for IAA,” he says. “Here we showed that the IAOx pathway contributes to IAA generation under high temperature conditions, and now we are studying the physiological roles of other IAA biosynthetic pathways.”

Reference

1. Sugawara, S., Hishiyama, S., Jikumaru, Y., Hanada, A., Nishimura, T., Koshiba, T., Zhao, Y., Kamiya, Y. & Kasahara, H. Biochemical analyses of indole-3-acetaldoxime-dependent auxin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 106, 5430–5435 (2009).

The corresponding author for this highlight is based at the RIKEN Growth Regulation Research Team

Saeko Okada | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.rikenresearch.riken.jp/research/705/
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Genetic Regulation of the Thymus Function Identified
23.08.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht Sun protection for plants - Plant substances can protect plants against harmful UV radiation
22.08.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Streamlining accelerated computing for industry

PyFR code combines high accuracy with flexibility to resolve unsteady turbulence problems

Scientists and engineers striving to create the next machine-age marvel--whether it be a more aerodynamic rocket, a faster race car, or a higher-efficiency jet...

Im Focus: Neues DFKI-Projekt SELFIE schlägt innovativen Weg in der Verifikation cyber-physischer Systeme ein

Vor der Markteinführung müssen neue Computersysteme auf ihre Korrektheit überprüft werden. Jedoch ist eine vollständige Verifikation aufgrund der Komplexität heutiger Rechner aus Zeitgründen oft nicht möglich. Im nun gestarteten Projekt SELFIE verfolgt der Forschungsbereich Cyber-Physical Systems des Deutschen Forschungszentrums für Künstliche Intelligenz (DFKI) unter Leitung von Prof. Dr. Rolf Drechsler einen grundlegend neuen Ansatz, der es Systemen ermöglicht, sich nach der Produktion und Auslieferung selbst zu verifizieren. Das Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) unterstützt das Vorhaben über drei Jahre mit einer Fördersumme von 1,4 Millionen Euro.

In den letzten Jahrzehnten wurden enorme Fortschritte in der Computertechnik erzielt. Ergebnis dieser Entwicklung sind eingebettete und cyber-physische...

Im Focus: „Künstliches Atom“ in Graphen-Schicht

Elektronen offenbaren ihre Quanteneigenschaften, wenn man sie in engen Bereichen gefangen hält. Ein Forschungsteam mit TU Wien-Beteiligung baut Elektronen-Gefängnisse in Graphen.

Wenn man Elektronen in einem engen Gefängnis einsperrt, dann benehmen sie sich ganz anders als im freien Raum. Ähnlich wie die Elektronen in einem Atom können...

Im Focus: X-ray optics on a chip

Waveguides are widely used for filtering, confining, guiding, coupling or splitting beams of visible light. However, creating waveguides that could do the same for X-rays has posed tremendous challenges in fabrication, so they are still only in an early stage of development.

In the latest issue of Acta Crystallographica Section A: Foundations and Advances , Sarah Hoffmann-Urlaub and Tim Salditt report the fabrication and testing of...

Im Focus: Quanten-Jonglieren mit freien Elektronen

Göttinger Wissenschaftler manipulieren Quantenzustand freier Elektronen mit Lichtfeldern

In der klassischen Physik kann ein Elektron nur eine einzige, bestimmte Geschwindigkeit annehmen. Quantenmechanisch ist es jedoch möglich, dass es sich in...

Alle Focus-News des Innovations-reports >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

IHR
JOB & KARRIERE
SERVICE
im innovations-report
in Kooperation mit academics
Veranstaltungen

HTW Berlin richtet im September die 30. EnviroInfo aus

23.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

micro photonics mit Kurs auf Premiere in Berlin

22.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

„BirdNumbers 2016“ - 300 Ornithologen kommen zu internationaler Tagung an die Uni Halle

22.08.2016 | Veranstaltungen

 
B2B-VideoLinks
Weitere VideoLinks >>>
Aktuelle Beiträge

Neue vertikale Leiterplatten-Steckverbinder

24.08.2016 | Energie und Elektrotechnik

Funksystem unterstützt Kabelnetzwerk

24.08.2016 | Energie und Elektrotechnik

Verschlüsse von Blutgefäßen: Wissenschaftler klären Mechanismus der zellulären Selbstheilung auf

24.08.2016 | Biowissenschaften Chemie